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  1. 6 points
  2. 6 points
    Theresa (my daughter) flew from Eindhoven to Manchester today of all days. Storm Doris made it interesting..... "Take off was bumpy. Above the clouds was pretty. Manchester closed their airport while we were in-flight. Then they opened it for landing. Circled for landing for 20 minutes. Tried to land twice...couldn't. Got diverted to Liverpool. 10 minutes before landing at Liverpool a fight broke out. Three minutes to landing and a very drunk idiot decided to walk up and down the plane....laughing and cheering at himself while 100 people are screaming at him to sit his butt down. 1minute later he does it again and a woman passes out (bear in mind it feels like we're on a rollercoaster). The plane landed sideways.10 people threw up around me and we've been sitting on the plane for 25 minutes while police taserd said idoit. Police escorted the fighters off and the paramedics are here treating the woman who passed out. And due to the shortage of baggage handlers (we're not next to the terminal, out in an open parking spot) we're going to wait a while before we can get our luggage. I need ground beneath my feet...pronto. And someone please give this cabin crew a massive bonus #bumpyflight #groundnowplease#imtoooldforthis " Looking forward to a Dad Hug later when I pick her up from her uncle's in Droitwich, he was good enough to offer to pick her up so had to contend with the diversion.
  3. 5 points
    I know we have a video of this display already a few posts back but I found another with slightly steadier camera work and a bit less wind noise and thought you chaps might like to see it...
  4. 5 points
  5. 5 points
    Some from the show That's the lot - hope you like 'em
  6. 5 points
  7. 5 points
    Home after a very good weekend, great to meet up with some of the gang, have checked and the photos came out fine despite the camera acting up, will sort them out and post them soon. Highlights were 5 hurricanes together then hurricanes, early spitfires and blenhem flight
  8. 5 points
  9. 5 points
  10. 5 points
  11. 5 points
    Hey gang. Hope you're all well. Still thinking of you all. Especially Painless. Sweet, sweet tender Painless. Anyway, just thought I'd pop in and let you know I met up with Cold_Gambler a couple weeks back in Ottawa. Angus is doing well and says to say hi. Like me, he wants to get back to flying one day...but like me, talks mores than does. Creepily, he hasn't aged a day since I last saw him - years back when I stopped through Toronto to see BG in his forest mansion hideway. I suspect he is part of some cult that drinks the blood of virgins to stay young our something. He wasn't happy when I stabbed with with a sharpened crucifix. I might have been over reacting. Planning on being out there for Duxford. Bringing Jensen (of Jensnpark fame) out to celebrate his high school grad. He was just 4 when I first stumbled upon BG and Angus way way back. time flies I tell you. Will make sure I drop in more often.
  12. 5 points
  13. 5 points
    I really enjoy flying Operation Jericho, cheers Tom for putting it together. One of the best parts is the feeling of realism in the mission, it works really well for me. Browsing through the 'net today I found a short Pathe News film about the raid that shows what we are out to achieve and how accurate we are in what we do! Brilliant stuff.
  14. 5 points
    Glad some of my ramblings have been of assistance, chaps. Now for the hard part... LANDING Hands down the trickiest module to land cleanly in DCS, with the 109 coming in a VERY close 2nd. However it can be done, and done so consistently. Practise, practise, practise. However, you need to have the correct procedure to practise with and at the moment whilst you'll probably being doing the right things you'll be doing them at the wrong time (mostly too soon). I shall elaborate. Part 1: The Prep First off is the approach - the adage goes that a good landing always starts with a good approach. This is doubly true of the DCS Spitty. Coming straight in from a long way out is just making life difficult for yourself; the curved approach give you much better visibility of your runway positioning down to the point at which you flare and cut. Long straight approaches - if done correctly - will hide the runway under that honking great nose and could mean lots of last minute corrections if you find yourself off centreline, with all sorts of potential for over correction and spurious energy in the aeroplane as you try and pull her back to centreline which will only make the flare and cut a more hurried affair, increasing your workload and making an awkward landing all too likely. If on straight in approach you can see the runway all the way in you're coming in damn steep and will make judging the flare all the more difficult. There's a reason that real Spit pilots adopt the curved approach - I would suggest you adopt the same procedure as a matter of course. As shown here from 19:15: Part 2: Touchdown! Many of you will be getting down in one piece (mostly) but having a very alarming experience doing so. Wingtips slapping the tarmac, no particular bias, left or right, but either way you're off in the grass, generally facing the wrong way perhaps with a prop strike and maybe some clipped wings. Sound familiar? Me too. I was having exactly the same as you chaps, until I tried cutting later and flaring at a lower alt; I suspected the wing drop was coming from having too much sink on contact with terra firma and the energy from this, whilst not enough to cause a bounce, was still more than could be absorbed by the u/c. With no airspeed/lift to get back up it threw the load into momentum about the u/c contact points thus one of the wings is thrown down. All this behaviour will be exacerbated if you have any side-slip or side load on the a/c as you touch down. Bootfuls of rudder should not be required at this stage in low cross-wind conditions (check your crosswinds by the way; if you're in a mission where you're trying to land in heavy crosswinds then have a rethink. Trying to run before learning to walk is only going to frustrate you). If you're making large corrections in any plane to get on centreline then GO AROUND. Call it quits and try again. It's that simple. So what's the lesson? Cut later and flare lower. Keep rudder input to a minimum. By deliberately flaring at a lower altitude we reduce the height at which we drop from = less energy. By cutting power later the aircraft settles rather than stalls, thus again reducing sink rate = less energy. The flare itself I make very gently - hence the later power cut - as the low longitudinal stability of the spit and the stick sensitivity makes it easy for the nose to end up higher than desired. Get all this right and you should be rewarded with a gentle settle onto the ground and a satisfying squeal of rubber on asphalt. As you see in the video, my mains touched first followed by the tail wheel a fraction of a second later, so it does not have to be perfect three-point. It's just that the margins are narrow for getting it wrong. Currently your major issues will be flaring too high and cutting too early; just hold off a bit longer on both and it should make life easier. Part 3: The Straight and Narrow You've touched down with no wing drop! Hooray! However, the Spitfire is not yet done trying to find ways to embarrass you and inattentiveness at this stage will end up with you in the grass with some major airframe components likely scattered around you. FLY THE PLANE! You are not done till you're sitting back at the pan with the engine off! All those issues you had at takeoff with directional instability are just waiting to throw you off the runway. Stick back in your lap once you're sure she's down and staying so. Get on the rudder like Michael Flatley (Lord of the Dance/Riverdance for those who need a point of reference) - just avoid brakes! You'll have plenty of airspeed for the rudder to be effective during the early part of the ground roll. Just like takeoff, keep the inputs short and sharp! Adding brakes too soon will throw you into the grass. As you slow you'll start to feel that rudder alone isn't quite cutting the mustard; your inputs to keep her straight will become larger and longer; it's at this point you start bringing in a dab of brakes to help keep her in line. But keep dancing! Finally you'll come to a stop, engine still running, pointing the same way and with all major and minor structures still attached. And it's now that you are allowed to breathe! Congratulations! Flaps away and get out the god-damn way cos someone's likely to be making their final approach and could do without worrying about bumping into you! Getting this right takes practise - it took me a good number of attempts to hit the right formula and get it right more than I got it wrong. However, I'm able to do this consistently now - as long as I concentrate! - so I assure you it's not impossible.
  15. 5 points
    That is a major pain in the harris m8. The writing has been on the wall since Shoreham I suppose : (. Perhaps a solution would be to create a venue especially for air shows far enough away from population centres and main roads to be deemed safe. I vote for that instead of a high speed rail link @£82bn. If only.......... Maybe re route the M11 a bit ? Any slightly more practical ideas ? If they keep on legislating the risks out of life like this, in another 50 years 25 million people will suddenly drop dead of boredom on a wet Tuesday afternoon.
  16. 5 points
    I recall, maybe incorrectly, one of our members (Friar?) lamenting the fact that he was unable to find the rather exquisite score written for the Horsemen warbird formation display team by the late James Horner. Hitherto fleeting snatches of it were available on some you tube videos but invariably cut about and overdubbed with hairyplane noises and much talking - anything but the full, unadulterated piece. Well, I recently discovered this; please enjoy. I know I do very, very much:
  17. 4 points
    I can appreciate what you guys are going through with this topic. IL2 still does have the most content of any WWII sim out there. It is going to go away at some point. Just like Janes WWII fighters and the like did because of the lack of Windows support in one way or the other. I was not a fan of BOS when it first came out; indeed I fully regretted buying it. That has all changed because they have not only improved the flight models, but the graphics are much better, especially with the addition of the Kuban map. I very much enjoy flying BOX and a number of us fly almost every evening. With the future addition of the Battle of Bodenplatte which includes 8 Aircraft (P-51D, P-47D, Spitfire Mk.IX, Tempest Mk.V, Bf 109 G-14, Bf 109 K-4, Fw 190 A-8 and Me 262) and 2 Collector Planes (P-38L and Fw 190 D-9) that can be bought separately, I think, currently, that is where the future of WWII simming lies. Someday maybe DCS will get its act together and fix the horrible damage modes on the AI aircraft, (using simple fight models for them) until then it BOX for me. And but the way about DCS and complexity, you always have the option to use “auto start”. I never thought I could fly the A10C but I learned with the help of some in the community (that would be Capt. Jack) I found the experience to be very enjoyable. Any one of you that have or thinking about getting BOX, as Jack said, I, Perfesser, Spaulding, Gustang, wingflyer, are flying almost every evening, we’d love to see you there. I never thought I would be saying all this about a sim I fully rejected from the outset. All I know is that whatever you all decide; I will be all in with my financial support for the Dogz as always.
  18. 4 points
  19. 4 points
    The water and the ramp will need a bit more attention
  20. 4 points
  21. 4 points
    Spent the day at a family's hobby of a miniature railway IMG_1467.MOV IMG_1480.MOV
  22. 4 points
    A bit of paraffin burning light relief (look away FT )
  23. 4 points
    Just a few from me and my Samsung Galaxy S7... Me and Jabo enjoying the sun and ale on the Friday: Berlin Express before she became a cabriolet: The beautiful dh 88 Comet: Count the Hurricanes! Fruitbat getting down and dirty for 'that' shot: Jabo and Delta7: Fruitbat and taking a break from flying duties, our very own bongodriver:
  24. 4 points
    So it appears that I managed to catch BE's canopy failing - sorry the photo's a bit blurred but it's interesting all the same - you can see the damage to the leading edges of the tail and tailplane clearly.
  25. 4 points
    Thanks to Dave, Kev, Chris, Tom, Sid and Bongo for a great weekend. Minor hiccups aside, the show was probably one of the better ones of recent years with a welcome return of the Horsemen, five Hurrricanes (!), 12 Spitfires, 5 Mustangs and plenty more. And (especially for Michael) some piccies - starting with Friday. Mustangs in the sunshine; Richard Grace and the Fury; Not Steve Hinton as we originally thought but one of the other pilots renewing their display licence in Sharky. Pigeon rolling Dragon Rapide flown by the recipient of the 'Handsomest Pilot' award. More Pigeon Arrivals Mmmm Messers Shipley, Hinton and Freidkin (and some random old dude) The Horsemen departeth... More Pony action - this might go on a bit... That was Friday then....
  26. 4 points
    here are some pics, I only have a compact camera which of course decided to act up , but this should give a flavour; Reprobates that kindly took care of me 5 hurricanes (not four candles) First time Id seen hurricane fly One of the mustangs The one I would have taken home if I could Flying highlight Nothing compaires to the gracefullness of a spitfire in flight or the sound of the merlins and griphons
  27. 4 points
    Working on the old rail bridge currently. On facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BuildingAModelBridge/
  28. 4 points
    Painless wins! Here's a little prize for you... Yes, for the first time ever I'm at the Shuttleworth Collection season opening air show. There's a Bristol Fighter in the overhead right now and I'm watching a Hawker Demon starting up. Lovely! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
  29. 4 points
    So as some of you know, I have a weakness for twins (stop sniggering.at the back there). Not that sort of twins, I mean of the aeroplane variety. So while the Beaufighter project still languishes in a half completed state (much like TFC's) I've been a little sidetracked by this; This is the Trumpeter 1:48 DH Hornet F.1 kit and very nice it is too.With the addition of a few PE and resin aftermarket doodads it's all gone together rather well. Just the top coat, decals, props and undercarriage to go.
  30. 4 points
    Dutch school kids remember and pay their respects to the Canadian soldiers that liberated their country... By lighting up their graves with candles... Here's a video ... Now I knew this was happening each and every year 'round Christmas, but just now I learned how this tradition started: A woman discovered a Finnish name on one of the stones, and she was familiar with a Finnish tradition... so, that's how it started 25 years ago, not just for that one Finnish name, but for all of the others resting there, all 1394 of them...
  31. 4 points
    Wonderful stuff, what a beauty! It's funny, the G-12 looks better in the flesh than any photograph or colour-plate would suggest. I also think this version of the swastika is a better alternative to either nothing or the modern German flag. The test pilot Charlie Brown, is one of the highest timed 109 pilots around and a serving RAF officer; how ironic! [emoji38] Tom and I have also flown with him in a Stearman… I'm sure we've mentioned that story one or two (hundred) times.
  32. 4 points
  33. 4 points
    Have you tried telling the phone company there's a war on?
  34. 4 points
    Some fantastic colour footage here chaps. Really like the Hurricane colour schemes in the open minutes, I feel a co-op mission set being built around it... I've not yet sat through the whole 40+ minutes, but it was enough to make want to post it here for sure.
  35. 4 points
  36. 4 points
    Definitely blippage FT, i'll seek some other videos soon! In the meantime, my jaw dropped at 2:44 on this one:
  37. 3 points
    So, yes, we do need new members. How are we going to get them? We should make a concentrated effort, and properly prepare it. What about: (just thinkin' out loud here) - A 'team' of recruiters that will set it up. Two or three members? - We need a new, fresh web page for that, where people can easily "sign up". (What we have now is too old/stale/long - as far as I can tell ... lol). - Properly describe our group, announcing what we fly, when and where. And our spirit(s). - Mentioning our 'events' (which are those?) If/when we start recruiting actively, we do need to make sure what we offer/announce is true to what we deliver. /can deliver We need to be ready. Meaning, if we get someone interested, and he/she clicks on a link, reads something, and tries and contact us - response should be swift and accurate. Sign up procedure should be easy - not too cumbersome. (I really dunno whát the current sign up is though...) Like said, just some ideas. Should we create a new thread, in maybe a less public place to discuss this all? That is - if my ideas on this are valid and being supported by us all
  38. 3 points
    Well after six months I must say BT and I are very happy together. I've had no problems and so far as I'm aware my connection has not dipped below the promised 50mb/s. In fact they seem to like me sooooo much that they're upgrading me to 76mb/s before the middle of November. Good show BT
  39. 3 points
    So, here's the completed section of the part that swings out, the car is in 1:87 scale, so it appears correctly, size wise that is, historically not so much, the car is way too modern. The light coloured horizontal beams that carry the deck are not glued in yet, so one can still vary the height of the deck. Still unsure whether I will create it with normal water level, or high water level. Here's some details on construction of the deck. Glueing all those planks on the frame. Each of them is 3mm wide. So, for 30cm I need 100 of them. No worries, I got 400. Yeah, I maybe miscalculated there. But, at a price of 1 Euro for 50, oh well. A lot of cutting to do though. Here's the jig I created for the railing. 6 cm of railing each time. An I need like well, not sure, but over 1 meters lenght I think, times two. At the bottom one finished piece. Test fitting the first bit. It fits, it works!
  40. 3 points
  41. 3 points
  42. 3 points
    Hey! I'm Japanese too!
  43. 3 points
    Hello chaps, After some conflab with some of you who are testing this module I thought I'd provide a common point of reference for some hints, tips and advice for operating this particular module. Lets just start with the obvious - it's hard. DCS WW2 aircraft are all tricky in their own rights but the Spit has it's own foibles particularly in ground handling and takeoff and landing, which no amount of Il-2 or CloD can prepare you for. Compound this with some very flexible control set-up options and our differing hardware can mean that everyone's control system is peculiar to them (particularly regards curves etc), with the result that one person's experience can differ from another and thusly their advice - whilst completely correct for their set-up - is not always helpful to others. With this in mind the best place to start is with some genuine tail-dragger instruction and behaviour primers; the best I have found are on the following threads and will provide you with some excellent insight as to WHY the aircraft is behaving the way it does: Essay, PART 1: Why taildraggers are tricky and how to overcome it! Essay, PART 2: Getting the tail up... ESSAY, PART 3: Landing and stopping. Some are incredulous at the Spitfires behaviours but if you have read the above you can see it DOES exhibit characteristics familiar to all taildragger aircraft. Do bear in mind we are at Beta-release so some refinements are always in the workshop. What I can tell you is that it IS manageable, almost (!) predictable and once you have figured out what you're doing wrong, can be consistently and safely taken off and landed. I had trouble myself on the first few takeoffs, and landings were a nightmare. However, by thinking through the issues logically as to why the aircraft was behaving in such a wayward manner I managed to adjust my technique to narrow the error margins and make takeoffs and landings a much less fraught affair. TAKEOFF First and foremost: ALWAYS ENSURE YOUR TAIL WHEEL IS STRAIGHT BEFORE COMMITTING TO TAKEOFF! As you make your final turn on to the runway and come to a stop around the centreline, if possible, go to external and check the tailwheel. Chances are it's pointing the direction you just turned from! If you power up now, guess which way you're gonna be headed? That's right - into the grass! As you get to the runway heading you should already be applying brake/rudder opposite to your turn in order to stop the a/c on the desired heading; the trick is not to stop dead once you've got her lined up but let the momentum carry you forward and roll a few yards/metres to ensure your tailwheel is pointing straight down the back of the tail. Now for the power up and takeoff roll: Your most fundamental mistake and the main cause of your woes will be over controlling, mainly on the rudder. Small and sharp inputs, of a high frequency are demanded. You'll practically be dancing on the rudder pedals. Example: Philstyles excellent youtube vid detailing his mastering of the takeoff Take good note of his rudder technique. Do bear in mind his rudder deadzone that he applies in this video is applicable to his pedals and set-up and is not a guaranteed cure to your issues unless you have a spiking input or some slack around the 0 point of your rudder pedals. As such I would not recommend that everyone mimics his curve profile. These aircraft have significant inertia - as such you have to pre-empt the airplane and the inputs have to be ahead of what's happening. Hold an input too heavy and/or too long and by the time you realise that it's effect has taken hold you have too much acceleration and inertia in the direction of that first control input for any countering input to be of any use. This is where Il-2 and CloD show their inaccuracy with small planes with big engines; as one who has soloed powered gliders I can confirm that the rudder inputs required in DCS on prop powered planes is significantly more realistic. Ergo what you are used to in Il-2 or CloD is significantly easier than real life. Trust the visual cues and your judgement; if you even suspect or sense the nose is moving left a bit then get a quick stab of right rudder in; if it still seems to be going then get another in, then another; you might put one too many stabs in and you sense the nose coming right now - but because the input was small and you're acting quickly you should only require a stab of left to correct. Short and sharp. It will take some dings and a few attempts to get the knack of this and actually takeoff. It will take even more till that take-off becomes a clean, elegant affair but at least you will be airbourne! I will strongly suggest everyone has their elevator trim set at at least 0 or -1 for take-off to avoid the sudden nose up tendency as the aircraft lifts out of ground effect. As Phil suggest use a maximum of +8lb Boost (red ringed gauge to RH side of dash) - this gives the nicest balance of acceleration and manageable torque forces. By moving it up promptly it will give your rudder better bite thanks to the propwash being blown over it's surface. That's it for now, the rest I leave to you. It will be frustrating, you will curse, you may even cry. However, as long as you can evaluate what is going wrong, why it's going wrong and what you're bringing to that equation, you can figure what you can do to correct it. PRACTISE and CONCENTRATION are two absolute bywords when getting the Spit off or back on the ground. Good luck chaps. Next time we'll discuss landing.
  44. 3 points
  45. 3 points
  46. 3 points
    This stuff is ridiculous. You can't legislate away all risks. Guess they should ban automobiles, the most dangerous part of an airshow is the drive to the airshow. Yeah its an airshow, s##t can happen, if you can't handle it, stay home. The real problem is this mindset is everywhere, like a slow creeping paralysis.
  47. 3 points
    No losses either. Nice work gents. No war stories? I'll start... I jumped in for a quick test flight alone (I know....) Got reports of a raid far south, I landed and took off again with full fuel. New plane but I'm sure there was nothing wrong with Hurri P2824. Missed them on the way in and turned to follow. Too late I found 9 bombers turning back from Farnborough at 16K. Above and behind were 12 escorts, 8 of whom took an unhealthy interest in my lone Hurri. I had altitude and gave them a good run, got hits on one but eventually they were equal altitude and energy and I was trying to figure out how to get away. I thought they were E-1's at first (yellow nose and wingtips) but I definitely saw cannon rounds exploding past me when one fired. They must have run low on fuel, at one point I looked back and nobody was there anymore. I turned to follow their reported egress heading in an empty sky, radar had them all at angels 1, and I caught up with them again near the coast skimming the trees. Pulled in behind a 109 and got him right at convergence with a short burst, his engine caught fire immediately, he rolled over and went straight in. I came back down from a zoom climb behind another and set his left wingroot on fire. I was about to get behind a third when I saw contacts off to the side. I thought it was the bombers or maybe a recon flight that had been reported (single at 2K)so I turned after them. Turns out they were balloons. By the time I turned back the sky was empty. I gave chase to that single radar contact just south of the coast near Rye, guessing it was a recon flight, but never found him. Low on fuel I turned for home but had to land at Eastchurch. Took off again with the same plane, V6603, and landed safe at home plate. Claiming 2 x 109 and another damaged.
  48. 3 points
    Ray Hanna 28/08/1928 - 01/12/05 It's hard to believe that 10 years have now passed since Ray left us. He and his late son Mark are what ignited my passion for aviation and particularly warbirds at an early age, thanks to PapaBear for exposing me to West Malling, Duxford and Biggin etc whilst still in nappies! Elliot Marsh from Global Aviation Resource has managed to articulate particularly well what Ray meant to many enthusiasts, his words resonating with my own thoughts and feelings. Scroll down to the bottom of this page for the article in question: http://www.globalaviationresource.com/v2/2015/12/01/editorial-december-2015-remembering-ray-hanna/ I could try and harp on, but more of my poorly articulated words would simply not do it justice. For those who were not familiar with Ray and his son Mark, or those who just wish to remember what it was like to see warbird flying at it's best, here are a selection of videos: https://youtu.be/XvmUqRY8fLw And of course these!
  49. 3 points
  50. 3 points
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