Jump to content


Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 03/19/2010 in all areas

  1. 6 points
  2. 6 points
    Theresa (my daughter) flew from Eindhoven to Manchester today of all days. Storm Doris made it interesting..... "Take off was bumpy. Above the clouds was pretty. Manchester closed their airport while we were in-flight. Then they opened it for landing. Circled for landing for 20 minutes. Tried to land twice...couldn't. Got diverted to Liverpool. 10 minutes before landing at Liverpool a fight broke out. Three minutes to landing and a very drunk idiot decided to walk up and down the plane....laughing and cheering at himself while 100 people are screaming at him to sit his butt down. 1minute later he does it again and a woman passes out (bear in mind it feels like we're on a rollercoaster). The plane landed sideways.10 people threw up around me and we've been sitting on the plane for 25 minutes while police taserd said idoit. Police escorted the fighters off and the paramedics are here treating the woman who passed out. And due to the shortage of baggage handlers (we're not next to the terminal, out in an open parking spot) we're going to wait a while before we can get our luggage. I need ground beneath my feet...pronto. And someone please give this cabin crew a massive bonus #bumpyflight #groundnowplease#imtoooldforthis " Looking forward to a Dad Hug later when I pick her up from her uncle's in Droitwich, he was good enough to offer to pick her up so had to contend with the diversion.
  3. 5 points
    I know we have a video of this display already a few posts back but I found another with slightly steadier camera work and a bit less wind noise and thought you chaps might like to see it...
  4. 5 points
  5. 5 points
    Some from the show That's the lot - hope you like 'em
  6. 5 points
  7. 5 points
    Home after a very good weekend, great to meet up with some of the gang, have checked and the photos came out fine despite the camera acting up, will sort them out and post them soon. Highlights were 5 hurricanes together then hurricanes, early spitfires and blenhem flight
  8. 5 points
  9. 5 points
  10. 5 points
  11. 5 points
    Hey gang. Hope you're all well. Still thinking of you all. Especially Painless. Sweet, sweet tender Painless. Anyway, just thought I'd pop in and let you know I met up with Cold_Gambler a couple weeks back in Ottawa. Angus is doing well and says to say hi. Like me, he wants to get back to flying one day...but like me, talks mores than does. Creepily, he hasn't aged a day since I last saw him - years back when I stopped through Toronto to see BG in his forest mansion hideway. I suspect he is part of some cult that drinks the blood of virgins to stay young our something. He wasn't happy when I stabbed with with a sharpened crucifix. I might have been over reacting. Planning on being out there for Duxford. Bringing Jensen (of Jensnpark fame) out to celebrate his high school grad. He was just 4 when I first stumbled upon BG and Angus way way back. time flies I tell you. Will make sure I drop in more often.
  12. 5 points
  13. 5 points
    I really enjoy flying Operation Jericho, cheers Tom for putting it together. One of the best parts is the feeling of realism in the mission, it works really well for me. Browsing through the 'net today I found a short Pathe News film about the raid that shows what we are out to achieve and how accurate we are in what we do! Brilliant stuff.
  14. 5 points
    Glad some of my ramblings have been of assistance, chaps. Now for the hard part... LANDING Hands down the trickiest module to land cleanly in DCS, with the 109 coming in a VERY close 2nd. However it can be done, and done so consistently. Practise, practise, practise. However, you need to have the correct procedure to practise with and at the moment whilst you'll probably being doing the right things you'll be doing them at the wrong time (mostly too soon). I shall elaborate. Part 1: The Prep First off is the approach - the adage goes that a good landing always starts with a good approach. This is doubly true of the DCS Spitty. Coming straight in from a long way out is just making life difficult for yourself; the curved approach give you much better visibility of your runway positioning down to the point at which you flare and cut. Long straight approaches - if done correctly - will hide the runway under that honking great nose and could mean lots of last minute corrections if you find yourself off centreline, with all sorts of potential for over correction and spurious energy in the aeroplane as you try and pull her back to centreline which will only make the flare and cut a more hurried affair, increasing your workload and making an awkward landing all too likely. If on straight in approach you can see the runway all the way in you're coming in damn steep and will make judging the flare all the more difficult. There's a reason that real Spit pilots adopt the curved approach - I would suggest you adopt the same procedure as a matter of course. As shown here from 19:15: Part 2: Touchdown! Many of you will be getting down in one piece (mostly) but having a very alarming experience doing so. Wingtips slapping the tarmac, no particular bias, left or right, but either way you're off in the grass, generally facing the wrong way perhaps with a prop strike and maybe some clipped wings. Sound familiar? Me too. I was having exactly the same as you chaps, until I tried cutting later and flaring at a lower alt; I suspected the wing drop was coming from having too much sink on contact with terra firma and the energy from this, whilst not enough to cause a bounce, was still more than could be absorbed by the u/c. With no airspeed/lift to get back up it threw the load into momentum about the u/c contact points thus one of the wings is thrown down. All this behaviour will be exacerbated if you have any side-slip or side load on the a/c as you touch down. Bootfuls of rudder should not be required at this stage in low cross-wind conditions (check your crosswinds by the way; if you're in a mission where you're trying to land in heavy crosswinds then have a rethink. Trying to run before learning to walk is only going to frustrate you). If you're making large corrections in any plane to get on centreline then GO AROUND. Call it quits and try again. It's that simple. So what's the lesson? Cut later and flare lower. Keep rudder input to a minimum. By deliberately flaring at a lower altitude we reduce the height at which we drop from = less energy. By cutting power later the aircraft settles rather than stalls, thus again reducing sink rate = less energy. The flare itself I make very gently - hence the later power cut - as the low longitudinal stability of the spit and the stick sensitivity makes it easy for the nose to end up higher than desired. Get all this right and you should be rewarded with a gentle settle onto the ground and a satisfying squeal of rubber on asphalt. As you see in the video, my mains touched first followed by the tail wheel a fraction of a second later, so it does not have to be perfect three-point. It's just that the margins are narrow for getting it wrong. Currently your major issues will be flaring too high and cutting too early; just hold off a bit longer on both and it should make life easier. Part 3: The Straight and Narrow You've touched down with no wing drop! Hooray! However, the Spitfire is not yet done trying to find ways to embarrass you and inattentiveness at this stage will end up with you in the grass with some major airframe components likely scattered around you. FLY THE PLANE! You are not done till you're sitting back at the pan with the engine off! All those issues you had at takeoff with directional instability are just waiting to throw you off the runway. Stick back in your lap once you're sure she's down and staying so. Get on the rudder like Michael Flatley (Lord of the Dance/Riverdance for those who need a point of reference) - just avoid brakes! You'll have plenty of airspeed for the rudder to be effective during the early part of the ground roll. Just like takeoff, keep the inputs short and sharp! Adding brakes too soon will throw you into the grass. As you slow you'll start to feel that rudder alone isn't quite cutting the mustard; your inputs to keep her straight will become larger and longer; it's at this point you start bringing in a dab of brakes to help keep her in line. But keep dancing! Finally you'll come to a stop, engine still running, pointing the same way and with all major and minor structures still attached. And it's now that you are allowed to breathe! Congratulations! Flaps away and get out the god-damn way cos someone's likely to be making their final approach and could do without worrying about bumping into you! Getting this right takes practise - it took me a good number of attempts to hit the right formula and get it right more than I got it wrong. However, I'm able to do this consistently now - as long as I concentrate! - so I assure you it's not impossible.
  15. 5 points
    That is a major pain in the harris m8. The writing has been on the wall since Shoreham I suppose : (. Perhaps a solution would be to create a venue especially for air shows far enough away from population centres and main roads to be deemed safe. I vote for that instead of a high speed rail link @£82bn. If only.......... Maybe re route the M11 a bit ? Any slightly more practical ideas ? If they keep on legislating the risks out of life like this, in another 50 years 25 million people will suddenly drop dead of boredom on a wet Tuesday afternoon.
  16. 5 points
    I recall, maybe incorrectly, one of our members (Friar?) lamenting the fact that he was unable to find the rather exquisite score written for the Horsemen warbird formation display team by the late James Horner. Hitherto fleeting snatches of it were available on some you tube videos but invariably cut about and overdubbed with hairyplane noises and much talking - anything but the full, unadulterated piece. Well, I recently discovered this; please enjoy. I know I do very, very much:
  17. 4 points
    Whilst out for a cycle ride this afternoon on one of my regular routes, something caught my eye on the corner of a T-junction about 2 miles from my house. It looked like a granite memorial headed with the recognisable RAF crested motto, something I can't remember seeing before; I carried on but made a point of stopping off to take a look on my return an hour later. It turned out to be a (relatively new) memorial to a 603 Squadron Spitfire pilot lost on Battle of Britain day: F/O Arthur Peter Pease Here's the excerpt from the BBM website: F/O A P Pease Arthur Peter Pease, the son of Sir Richard and Lady Pease of Richmond, Yorkshire was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he read History. He was a member of the University Air Squadron and was commissioned in the RAFVR in September 1938. Called to full-time service in October 1939, Pease completed his flying training and was posted to No.1 School of Army Co-operation at Old Sarum in late May 1940. He met Richard Hillary there and they became friends. They went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on 23rd June and after converting to Spitfires they joined 603 Squadron at Dyce on 6th July. Pease shared in destroying a He111 on the 30th. He was hit by return fire but returned to Montrose, unhurt. On 3rd September he claimed a Me109 destroyed and on the 7th he made a belly-landing back at Hornchurch in Spitfire L1057, after being damaged in combat over London. On 15th September 1940 Pease was shot down and killed in combat. His Spitfire, X4324, crashed at Kingswood, near Chartway Street, Kent. He was 22 and is buried in the churchyard of St.Michael and All Saints at Middleton Tyas, Yorkshire. It's the closest Battle of Britain loss to where I live that I'm aware of and it kind of struck a chord with me today, especially as I hadn't previously been aware of it; I've lived in this area now for almost 12 years. So, I've decided to honour F/O Pease, virtually. For the foreseeable future, I will be flying in the Spitfire he was lost in, X4324 on Thursday's CloD nights. Further reading here, it seems a retired American academic paved the way for the above memorial: http://www.thenorthernecho.co.uk/features/13610056.An_American_academic_seeks_to_honour_a_Battle_of_Britain_hero_from_a_famous_family/
  18. 4 points
    Read it here chaps, featuring some stunning photography of the graceful old bird: http://vintageaviationecho.com/arco-blenheim/
  19. 4 points
    I can appreciate what you guys are going through with this topic. IL2 still does have the most content of any WWII sim out there. It is going to go away at some point. Just like Janes WWII fighters and the like did because of the lack of Windows support in one way or the other. I was not a fan of BOS when it first came out; indeed I fully regretted buying it. That has all changed because they have not only improved the flight models, but the graphics are much better, especially with the addition of the Kuban map. I very much enjoy flying BOX and a number of us fly almost every evening. With the future addition of the Battle of Bodenplatte which includes 8 Aircraft (P-51D, P-47D, Spitfire Mk.IX, Tempest Mk.V, Bf 109 G-14, Bf 109 K-4, Fw 190 A-8 and Me 262) and 2 Collector Planes (P-38L and Fw 190 D-9) that can be bought separately, I think, currently, that is where the future of WWII simming lies. Someday maybe DCS will get its act together and fix the horrible damage modes on the AI aircraft, (using simple fight models for them) until then it BOX for me. And but the way about DCS and complexity, you always have the option to use “auto start”. I never thought I could fly the A10C but I learned with the help of some in the community (that would be Capt. Jack) I found the experience to be very enjoyable. Any one of you that have or thinking about getting BOX, as Jack said, I, Perfesser, Spaulding, Gustang, wingflyer, are flying almost every evening, we’d love to see you there. I never thought I would be saying all this about a sim I fully rejected from the outset. All I know is that whatever you all decide; I will be all in with my financial support for the Dogz as always.
  20. 4 points
  21. 4 points
    The water and the ramp will need a bit more attention
  22. 4 points
  23. 4 points
    Spent the day at a family's hobby of a miniature railway IMG_1467.MOV IMG_1480.MOV
  24. 4 points
    A bit of paraffin burning light relief (look away FT )
  25. 4 points
    Just a few from me and my Samsung Galaxy S7... Me and Jabo enjoying the sun and ale on the Friday: Berlin Express before she became a cabriolet: The beautiful dh 88 Comet: Count the Hurricanes! Fruitbat getting down and dirty for 'that' shot: Jabo and Delta7: Fruitbat and taking a break from flying duties, our very own bongodriver:
  26. 4 points
    So it appears that I managed to catch BE's canopy failing - sorry the photo's a bit blurred but it's interesting all the same - you can see the damage to the leading edges of the tail and tailplane clearly.
  27. 4 points
    Thanks to Dave, Kev, Chris, Tom, Sid and Bongo for a great weekend. Minor hiccups aside, the show was probably one of the better ones of recent years with a welcome return of the Horsemen, five Hurrricanes (!), 12 Spitfires, 5 Mustangs and plenty more. And (especially for Michael) some piccies - starting with Friday. Mustangs in the sunshine; Richard Grace and the Fury; Not Steve Hinton as we originally thought but one of the other pilots renewing their display licence in Sharky. Pigeon rolling Dragon Rapide flown by the recipient of the 'Handsomest Pilot' award. More Pigeon Arrivals Mmmm Messers Shipley, Hinton and Freidkin (and some random old dude) The Horsemen departeth... More Pony action - this might go on a bit... That was Friday then....
  28. 4 points
    here are some pics, I only have a compact camera which of course decided to act up , but this should give a flavour; Reprobates that kindly took care of me 5 hurricanes (not four candles) First time Id seen hurricane fly One of the mustangs The one I would have taken home if I could Flying highlight Nothing compaires to the gracefullness of a spitfire in flight or the sound of the merlins and griphons
  29. 4 points
    Working on the old rail bridge currently. On facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BuildingAModelBridge/
  30. 4 points
    Painless wins! Here's a little prize for you... Yes, for the first time ever I'm at the Shuttleworth Collection season opening air show. There's a Bristol Fighter in the overhead right now and I'm watching a Hawker Demon starting up. Lovely! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
  31. 4 points
    So as some of you know, I have a weakness for twins (stop sniggering.at the back there). Not that sort of twins, I mean of the aeroplane variety. So while the Beaufighter project still languishes in a half completed state (much like TFC's) I've been a little sidetracked by this; This is the Trumpeter 1:48 DH Hornet F.1 kit and very nice it is too.With the addition of a few PE and resin aftermarket doodads it's all gone together rather well. Just the top coat, decals, props and undercarriage to go.
  32. 4 points
    Dutch school kids remember and pay their respects to the Canadian soldiers that liberated their country... By lighting up their graves with candles... Here's a video ... Now I knew this was happening each and every year 'round Christmas, but just now I learned how this tradition started: A woman discovered a Finnish name on one of the stones, and she was familiar with a Finnish tradition... so, that's how it started 25 years ago, not just for that one Finnish name, but for all of the others resting there, all 1394 of them...
  33. 4 points
    Wonderful stuff, what a beauty! It's funny, the G-12 looks better in the flesh than any photograph or colour-plate would suggest. I also think this version of the swastika is a better alternative to either nothing or the modern German flag. The test pilot Charlie Brown, is one of the highest timed 109 pilots around and a serving RAF officer; how ironic! [emoji38] Tom and I have also flown with him in a Stearman… I'm sure we've mentioned that story one or two (hundred) times.
  34. 4 points
  35. 4 points
    Have you tried telling the phone company there's a war on?
  36. 4 points
    Some fantastic colour footage here chaps. Really like the Hurricane colour schemes in the open minutes, I feel a co-op mission set being built around it... I've not yet sat through the whole 40+ minutes, but it was enough to make want to post it here for sure.
  37. 4 points
  38. 4 points
    Definitely blippage FT, i'll seek some other videos soon! In the meantime, my jaw dropped at 2:44 on this one:
  39. 3 points
    I know some of you are a bit in the dark as to when the release version will be available for you to update to, and wondering what's taking so long, so I've copied in the patch notes detailing the bugfixes and some of the ongoing issues the developers have come across: Improved NVG picture. ES and CN localization update. ME. Ships groups. Ship skill will not accidentally changed after mouse click. APC AVV-7 40mm Mk.19 HE ammunition replaced by HEDP. Added new model of small helipads (FARP) for single helicopter. Added AI China AWACS KJ-2000. DCS NTTR Object 'CONCREET_CAN" destroyed state corrected. DCS Ka-50 Added separate option slider for the helmet sight-ring displacement. DCS AJS-37 New feature! auto-generated data cartridge. Choosable in the kneeboard (# 6) The Auto-generated data cartridge is a cartridge with five pre-programmed waypoints, where the third waypoint will be located on the first expected enemy units. This waypoint will take into account projected target movement and if you follow Time on Target cues, you will intercept your target. This is a work in progress feature. You can now load a data-cartridge file stored in the saved games-folder without respawning. Details on this will be posted on the forums. New Export of ELINT-analysis data to Saved games-folder added! It will be located in the %SAVED_GAMES%/DCS_AJS37/ELINTData.info file. The DCS_AJS37-folder must exist for export to work. This is a work in progress feature. Added new JA-37Di “Akktu Stakki” Livery by Magnus Almgren https://imgur.com/a/FiYYE Fixed FORMLJUS not illuminating tail with deferred rendering on Fixed fuselage FORMLJUS (slimelights) not appearing with deferred rendering on Corrected landing light sprite movement Landing light distance and attenuation reworked for deferred rendering Landing light will no longer illuminate the cockpit Landing light will now follow nosewheel strut rotation. Wing nav/formation lights will now cast dynamic lighting Fixed static airfield AJS-37 missing canopy & ejection seat issue. Adjusted PBR materials for new tonemapper gamma Fixed missing Bare Metal livery Fixed missing ordinance icons Fixed duplicate material name of canopy glass & rocket pod (Thanks Home Fries!) Replaced default Viggen briefing UI image Corrected AKAN Gunpod size Fix to RWR showing ghost signals Fixes to Time On Target calculation accuracy Fix to second BK90 MJ1 not releasing Fix to Glideslope indication issues. Fix to inaccurate DYK and NAV bombing Fix to Maverick-sight going off target Fix to Easter egg triggering erroneously. (or, rather, in common flight parameters) Fixed Lysbomb not releasing and FÄLLD LAST light not activating Various Fixes to U22 and U22/A pods Corrected shader parameters for cockpit Corrected shader parameters for LoD1/2/3 to fit better with LoD0 Exterior. Removed all instances std::rand() and replaced with ED’s replay-consistent random object. (does not fix all replay issues yet!) Fixed Droptank fuel weight not being removed from aircraft Fix to lift performance in slow speeds/high alpha flight Corrected shader parameters for all ordinance models. Fixed default radio frequencies. Fixed an issue where an AI aircraft could not be assigned to common frequency ranges. Adjusted missions for 2.5 Caucasus. Fixed Canopy Glass in cockpit being practically invisible. Fixed doubled up canard vortices and right wing will now generate vortices. Adjusted ‘Mozdok Attack’,‘Moscow Takedown’ and ‘Attack the Camp’ Single missions for new Caucasus (thanks Grimes & Graywo1f!) Darkened HUD Glass & adjusted indicator material for better HUD visibility Added new F7 Skaraborg’s flygflottilj livery for Caucasus Mini-Campaign DCS MiG-21Bis by Magnitude 3 LLC Adjusted external textures for deferred shading. Stabilized radar on horizon. Control panel for Nukes now shows. Nukes’ 3D model now shows on aircraft. SPS Box now shows. CampaignsAdapted paid campaigns to new Caucasus: F-15C The Georgian War Сampaign A-10C The Enemy Within Campaign A-10C Tactical Training Qualification Campaign A-10C Basic Flight Training Campaign A-10C Advanced Aircraft Training Qualification Campaign UH-1H Argo Campaign The Border Campaign A-10C Operation Piercing Fury Campaign The Museum Relic Campaign P-51D High Stakes Campaign Black Shark 2 Republic Campaign Su-27 The Ultimate Argument Campaign A-10C Stone Shield Campaign Mi-8MTV2 Oilfield Campaign. In additional added two new missions for single and multiplayer. NOTE: for all those campaigns implemented the new keyless copy protection. This update will be available only for Open Beta so far. 02-06-2018, 02:56 PM DCS 2.5.0 HOTFIX 1 Fixed crash on loading mission with Bf-109 in VR mode. Fixed CTD in "A-10C Sturmovik" campaign mission 1. Fixed corrupted font in kneeboard. The Grace Period will be granted even if DRM Server is down. Fixed login issue in Steam version. Fixed crash on mark panels added by scripting engine. Ground unit will not shoot at targets if a friendly unit is behind target, in the firing line. Flak 37 will not shoots below the target at short ranges. Corrected sound of controllable ground unit in the cruise control mode. Now you can delete missions or tracks with Delete key in the Mission and Track open panels. Fixed CTD when static object destroyed by scripting engine or AI unit. Changed tainted files checking logic. NS430 - Arrivals should only appear once in the popup scroll window, transitions are chosen separately. NS430 - popup window interferes with night vision goggles and has odd visual artifacts. NS430 - GPS incorrectly activates flight plan when arriving at direct-to destination not in the plan. Fixed launch type of AGM-84A. UH-1H UN Pilot campaign. Fixed CTD in final mission. CA. BMP-3. Corrected main sight appearance after switch to secondary and tun back. Operation Piercing Fury Update to Mission 2 & 4. NOTE We are working hard towards a memory leak solution. 02-09-2018, 12:31 PM DCS 2.5.0 HOTFIX 2 FC3 aircraft. Eliminated green dot in the HUD. NS430 - approach data errors: KVGT The 'comment' value of User mark panel via scripting engine will be optional. MP server list. First 3 columns will not be too narrow. MP server list. The ability to sort the rows by clicking on the column title. Corrected air-launch Harpoon performance. AWACS. Corrected "at bulls/at bullseye XXX" messages. MP. F10 map. Nickname of client will not be displayed after client's icon disappearing. Fixed crash on cargo intersects with objects. MP. Fixed server crash with transport.dll. HAI : Game freezes when Mi-28 trying to land - fixed. 02-14-2018, 12:53 PM 2018-02-14 HOTFIX 3 Updated several missions of UH-1H Argo Campaign. Updated several missions of A-10C The Enemy Within Campaign. MP anticheat. Speed relative explosion power is clamped to 500 m/s. Controlled Ground units can pass through tunnel wall. Fixed. Fixed issue with ground AI when given stop and resume triggers returns to previous WP instead of continuing the route. UH-1H UN Campaign mission 2 trigger will working. Fixed ME error me_map_window.lua in dynamic weather panel. Sea waves animation will be works correctly from inside some cockpits. Multiple flights starting on a FARP at the same time will not spawn on a player. Tanker will be fill external tanks of aircraft. B-17G ball turret will fire. B-17G will attack enemy at second approach. UH-1H: Fixed issue with barometric altimeters when atmospheric pressure below limit. AI Radio. Fixed error in wMessage::buildSpeechQ appearing in some conditions. DCS AV-8B N/A by RAZBAM Corrected empty fuel tank definition Cockpit model improvements External model improvements Added EHSD Moving Map (Work-in-Progress) Added TPOD laser ranging Updated TPOD TDC movements Updated TPOD target transfer Corrected aircraft basic empty weight (slightly too low before) Corrected aircraft basic empty roll inertia (too high before, creating incorrect roll response) Corrected combat rating not allowed when nozzles not aft or gear down Corrected very high altitude engine performance (>35000ft, was insufficient before) DCS M-2000C by RAZBAM Improved pitch responsiveness Improved AP responsiveness and control Improved extreme angle of attack behavior Improved engine malfunction modeling during in-flow loss Controls indicator now also shows trim position (previously only shown during AP engagement) Removed innacurate altitude limitations for AP engagement Corrected nature of trim control sensitivity to be relative to framerate Corrected nature of AP heading and trim control sensitivity to be relative to framerate Corrected helmet visor animation and reversal between external and cockpit view Corrected direction of trim indicator in controls indicator Corrected innacurate pitch moment with airbrake deployment 03-14-2018, 09:35 AM DCS 2.5 Open Beta Update 4 MP. Fixed issue when client can only see up to 5 ground units that are stationary. MP. Ground units will be able to activated on client. MP. Fixed crash on P-51D MainPanel:update_arguments(). MP. Client in multiplayer will see missiles of SAM launcher after its rearming. MP. Fixed issue when player can't join server with password if he previously enter incorrect password. MP. Stingers and Igla missiles will be visible for Clients. MP. Fixed multi-monitor setup crashes when joining or hosting multiplayer game. Speed indication on external view status bar will show more number positions. Aircraft AI will take damage after collision with trees. Enemy Within campaign. Added Doc folder and corrected missions. Museum Relic campaign. Added corrected missions, version 2.6. A-10C. Typo correction German A-10C manual. Mi-8MTV2. Spring Tension campaign updated for DCS 2.5 Mi-8MTV2. Wrong reading of the working pressure in the hydraulic system fixed. A10C Sturmovik campaign adapted for DCS 2.5. Stryker M1128. Corrected machine gun position. Corrected waterline level of several amphibious ground units. NS430. 2nd ref wpt for user waypoints is calculated incorrectly when changing distance manually. NS430. Approach data errors: KHND. NS430. Menu button breaks Right Knob. Updated and corrected Vegas tour missions. Fixed issue when trigger zone can't be moved. GUI. The open mission panel. Sorting order in mission list will be saved. Increased max number of sound hosts for avoidance runtime errors in complicated sound conditions with many sound emitters. L-39. Update training missions. Fixed crash when player switches to another aircraft on the ship's deck. Georgian Hammer with CA campaign adapted to DCS 2.5. As you can see the bugfix list has been quite comprehensive, but the most serious issue is of course that memory leak, which annoyingly seems to most afflict multiplayer. Hopefully they've made progress towards this and we'll see some solution soon; I for one can't wait to join up with some fellow Dogz in DCS 2.5 skies! Hang in there fellas....
  40. 3 points
    From the net. As a former SR-71 pilot, and a professional keynote speaker, the question I'm most often asked is "How fast would that SR-71 fly?" I can be assured of hearing that question several times at any event I attend. It's an interesting question, given the aircraft's proclivity for speed, but there really isn't one number to give, as the jet would always give you a little more speed if you wanted it to. It was common to see 35 miles a minute. Because we flew a programmed Mach number on most missions, and never wanted to harm the plane in any way, we never let it run out to any limits of temperature or speed. Thus, each SR-71 pilot had his own individual “high” speed that he saw at some point on some mission. I saw mine over Libya when Khadafy fired two missiles my way, and max power was in order. Let’s just say that the plane truly loved speed and effortlessly took us to Mach numbers we hadn’t previously seen. So it was with great surprise, when at the end of one of my presentations, someone asked, “what was the slowest you ever flew the Blackbird?” This was a first. After giving it some thought, I was reminded of a story that I had never shared before, and relayed the following. I was flying the SR-71 out of RAF Mildenhall, England , with my back-seater, Walt Watson; we were returning from a mission over Europe and the Iron Curtain when we received a radio transmission from home base. As we scooted across Denmark in three minutes, we learned that a small RAF base in the English countryside had requested an SR-71 fly-past. The air cadet commander there was a former Blackbird pilot, and thought it would be a motivating moment for the young lads to see the mighty SR-71 perform a low approach. No problem, we were happy to do it. After a quick aerial refueling over the North Sea , we proceeded to find the small airfield. Walter had a myriad of sophisticated navigation equipment in the back seat, and began to vector me toward the field. Descending to subsonic speeds, we found ourselves over a densely wooded area in a slight haze. Like most former WWII British airfields, the one we were looking for had a small tower and little surrounding infrastructure. Walter told me we were close and that I should be able to see the field, but I saw nothing. Nothing but trees as far as I could see in the haze. We got a little lower, and I pulled the throttles back from 325 knots we were at. With the gear up, anything under 275 was just uncomfortable. Walt said we were practically over the field—yet; there was nothing in my windscreen. I banked the jet and started a gentle circling maneuver in hopes of picking up anything that looked like a field. Meanwhile, below, the cadet commander had taken the cadets up on the catwalk of the tower in order to get a prime view of the fly-past. It was a quiet, still day with no wind and partial gray overcast. Walter continued to give me indications that the field should be below us but in the overcast and haze, I couldn't see it.. The longer we continued to peer out the window and circle, the slower we got. With our power back, the awaiting cadets heard nothing. I must have had good instructors in my flying career, as something told me I better cross-check the gauges. As I noticed the airspeed indicator slide below 160 knots, my heart stopped and my adrenalin-filled left hand pushed two throttles full forward. At this point we weren't really flying, but were falling in a slight bank. Just at the moment that both afterburners lit with a thunderous roar of flame (and what a joyous feeling that was) the aircraft fell into full view of the shocked observers on the tower. Shattering the still quiet of that morning, they now had 107 feet of fire-breathing titanium in their face as the plane leveled and accelerated, in full burner, on the tower side of the infield, closer than expected, maintaining what could only be described as some sort of ultimate knife-edge pass. Quickly reaching the field boundary, we proceeded back to Mildenhall without incident. We didn't say a word for those next 14 minutes. After landing, our commander greeted us, and we were both certain he was reaching for our wings. Instead, he heartily shook our hands and said the commander had told him it was the greatest SR-71 fly-past he had ever seen, especially how we had surprised them with such a precise maneuver that could only be described as breathtaking. He said that some of the cadet’s hats were blown off and the sight of the plan form of the plane in full afterburner dropping right in front of them was unbelievable. Walt and I both understood the concept of “breathtaking” very well that morning, and sheepishly replied that they were just excited to see our low approach. As we retired to the equipment room to change from space suits to flight suits, we just sat there-we hadn't spoken a word since “the pass.” Finally, Walter looked at me and said, “One hundred fifty-six knots. What did you see?” Trying to find my voice, I stammered, “One hundred fifty-two.” We sat in silence for a moment. Then Walt said, “Don’t ever do that to me again!” And I never did. A year later, Walter and I were having lunch in the Mildenhall Officer’s club, and overheard an officer talking to some cadets about an SR-71 fly-past that he had seen one day. Of course, by now the story included kids falling off the tower and screaming as the heat of the jet singed their eyebrows. Noticing our HABU patches, as we stood there with lunch trays in our hands, he asked us to verify to the cadets that such a thing had occurred. Walt just shook his head and said, “It was probably just a routine low approach; they're pretty impressive in that plane.” Impressive indeed. Little did I realize after relaying this experience to my audience that day that it would become one of the most popular and most requested stories. It’s ironic that people are interested in how slow the world’s fastest jet can fly. Regardless of your speed, however, it’s always a good idea to keep that cross-check up…and keep your Mach up, too.
  41. 3 points
    Good quote from the SoW forum from Stg 77 Count zero And usually in coops people would read briefings and do as told HaHaHA!
  42. 3 points
    I am growing old but I have no intention of growing up
  43. 3 points
    So, yes, we do need new members. How are we going to get them? We should make a concentrated effort, and properly prepare it. What about: (just thinkin' out loud here) - A 'team' of recruiters that will set it up. Two or three members? - We need a new, fresh web page for that, where people can easily "sign up". (What we have now is too old/stale/long - as far as I can tell ... lol). - Properly describe our group, announcing what we fly, when and where. And our spirit(s). - Mentioning our 'events' (which are those?) If/when we start recruiting actively, we do need to make sure what we offer/announce is true to what we deliver. /can deliver We need to be ready. Meaning, if we get someone interested, and he/she clicks on a link, reads something, and tries and contact us - response should be swift and accurate. Sign up procedure should be easy - not too cumbersome. (I really dunno whát the current sign up is though...) Like said, just some ideas. Should we create a new thread, in maybe a less public place to discuss this all? That is - if my ideas on this are valid and being supported by us all
  44. 3 points
    I have been largely away because of personal issues and in the past year I'm unable to get to my 'puter until minutes before everyone is packing it in because of work. I'm awaiting developments in CloD eagerly and I have pretty much decided to start picking up with BoX as I can afford it. I am a little leery of spending money on games because other people are playing them, as I have a whole stack of those that I've played for a minute then lost interest when every one else did, but I don't consider the Dogz "other people", so yeah, I'm for certain interested in keeping up with whatever transpires here, and I hope to be able to join up more in the future. In the end no matter that I enjoy space games and Shooters and any number of other computer related distractions, flight sims are my first love and the Dogz are my squad whatever else happens.
  45. 3 points
  46. 3 points
    From our little bro' in the west.
  47. 3 points
    This afternoon - from my kitchen door
  48. 3 points
  49. 3 points
    We've had this discussion before - "what was the prettiest warbird ever?" The answers are as diverse as the Dogz, but the DH 103, better known perhaps as the Hornet usually features somewhere in there. As you may know, models, even photos of the Hornet are pretty rare - so I was pretty stoked to find this in my local model shop. One of only two currently available in the UK. And seeing as it's you lot and I like you, here's a couple more (and this will be the only time it will stand on the undercarriage) I'm a happy Jabo! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  50. 3 points
    Ray Hanna 28/08/1928 - 01/12/05 It's hard to believe that 10 years have now passed since Ray left us. He and his late son Mark are what ignited my passion for aviation and particularly warbirds at an early age, thanks to PapaBear for exposing me to West Malling, Duxford and Biggin etc whilst still in nappies! Elliot Marsh from Global Aviation Resource has managed to articulate particularly well what Ray meant to many enthusiasts, his words resonating with my own thoughts and feelings. Scroll down to the bottom of this page for the article in question: http://www.globalaviationresource.com/v2/2015/12/01/editorial-december-2015-remembering-ray-hanna/ I could try and harp on, but more of my poorly articulated words would simply not do it justice. For those who were not familiar with Ray and his son Mark, or those who just wish to remember what it was like to see warbird flying at it's best, here are a selection of videos: https://youtu.be/XvmUqRY8fLw And of course these!