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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/19/2010 in all areas

  1. 6 points
  2. 6 points
    Theresa (my daughter) flew from Eindhoven to Manchester today of all days. Storm Doris made it interesting..... "Take off was bumpy. Above the clouds was pretty. Manchester closed their airport while we were in-flight. Then they opened it for landing. Circled for landing for 20 minutes. Tried to land twice...couldn't. Got diverted to Liverpool. 10 minutes before landing at Liverpool a fight broke out. Three minutes to landing and a very drunk idiot decided to walk up and down the plane....laughing and cheering at himself while 100 people are screaming at him to sit his butt down. 1minute later he does it again and a woman passes out (bear in mind it feels like we're on a rollercoaster). The plane landed sideways.10 people threw up around me and we've been sitting on the plane for 25 minutes while police taserd said idoit. Police escorted the fighters off and the paramedics are here treating the woman who passed out. And due to the shortage of baggage handlers (we're not next to the terminal, out in an open parking spot) we're going to wait a while before we can get our luggage. I need ground beneath my feet...pronto. And someone please give this cabin crew a massive bonus #bumpyflight #groundnowplease#imtoooldforthis " Looking forward to a Dad Hug later when I pick her up from her uncle's in Droitwich, he was good enough to offer to pick her up so had to contend with the diversion.
  3. 5 points
    Whilst out for a cycle ride this afternoon on one of my regular routes, something caught my eye on the corner of a T-junction about 2 miles from my house. It looked like a granite memorial headed with the recognisable RAF crested motto, something I can't remember seeing before; I carried on but made a point of stopping off to take a look on my return an hour later. It turned out to be a (relatively new) memorial to a 603 Squadron Spitfire pilot lost on Battle of Britain day: F/O Arthur Peter Pease Here's the excerpt from the BBM website: F/O A P Pease Arthur Peter Pease, the son of Sir Richard and Lady Pease of Richmond, Yorkshire was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he read History. He was a member of the University Air Squadron and was commissioned in the RAFVR in September 1938. Called to full-time service in October 1939, Pease completed his flying training and was posted to No.1 School of Army Co-operation at Old Sarum in late May 1940. He met Richard Hillary there and they became friends. They went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on 23rd June and after converting to Spitfires they joined 603 Squadron at Dyce on 6th July. Pease shared in destroying a He111 on the 30th. He was hit by return fire but returned to Montrose, unhurt. On 3rd September he claimed a Me109 destroyed and on the 7th he made a belly-landing back at Hornchurch in Spitfire L1057, after being damaged in combat over London. On 15th September 1940 Pease was shot down and killed in combat. His Spitfire, X4324, crashed at Kingswood, near Chartway Street, Kent. He was 22 and is buried in the churchyard of St.Michael and All Saints at Middleton Tyas, Yorkshire. It's the closest Battle of Britain loss to where I live that I'm aware of and it kind of struck a chord with me today, especially as I hadn't previously been aware of it; I've lived in this area now for almost 12 years. So, I've decided to honour F/O Pease, virtually. For the foreseeable future, I will be flying in the Spitfire he was lost in, X4324 on Thursday's CloD nights. Further reading here, it seems a retired American academic paved the way for the above memorial: http://www.thenorthernecho.co.uk/features/13610056.An_American_academic_seeks_to_honour_a_Battle_of_Britain_hero_from_a_famous_family/
  4. 5 points
    I know we have a video of this display already a few posts back but I found another with slightly steadier camera work and a bit less wind noise and thought you chaps might like to see it...
  5. 5 points
  6. 5 points
    Some from the show That's the lot - hope you like 'em
  7. 5 points
  8. 5 points
    Home after a very good weekend, great to meet up with some of the gang, have checked and the photos came out fine despite the camera acting up, will sort them out and post them soon. Highlights were 5 hurricanes together then hurricanes, early spitfires and blenhem flight
  9. 5 points
  10. 5 points
  11. 5 points
  12. 5 points
    Hey gang. Hope you're all well. Still thinking of you all. Especially Painless. Sweet, sweet tender Painless. Anyway, just thought I'd pop in and let you know I met up with Cold_Gambler a couple weeks back in Ottawa. Angus is doing well and says to say hi. Like me, he wants to get back to flying one day...but like me, talks mores than does. Creepily, he hasn't aged a day since I last saw him - years back when I stopped through Toronto to see BG in his forest mansion hideway. I suspect he is part of some cult that drinks the blood of virgins to stay young our something. He wasn't happy when I stabbed with with a sharpened crucifix. I might have been over reacting. Planning on being out there for Duxford. Bringing Jensen (of Jensnpark fame) out to celebrate his high school grad. He was just 4 when I first stumbled upon BG and Angus way way back. time flies I tell you. Will make sure I drop in more often.
  13. 5 points
  14. 5 points
    I really enjoy flying Operation Jericho, cheers Tom for putting it together. One of the best parts is the feeling of realism in the mission, it works really well for me. Browsing through the 'net today I found a short Pathe News film about the raid that shows what we are out to achieve and how accurate we are in what we do! Brilliant stuff.
  15. 5 points
    Glad some of my ramblings have been of assistance, chaps. Now for the hard part... LANDING Hands down the trickiest module to land cleanly in DCS, with the 109 coming in a VERY close 2nd. However it can be done, and done so consistently. Practise, practise, practise. However, you need to have the correct procedure to practise with and at the moment whilst you'll probably being doing the right things you'll be doing them at the wrong time (mostly too soon). I shall elaborate. Part 1: The Prep First off is the approach - the adage goes that a good landing always starts with a good approach. This is doubly true of the DCS Spitty. Coming straight in from a long way out is just making life difficult for yourself; the curved approach give you much better visibility of your runway positioning down to the point at which you flare and cut. Long straight approaches - if done correctly - will hide the runway under that honking great nose and could mean lots of last minute corrections if you find yourself off centreline, with all sorts of potential for over correction and spurious energy in the aeroplane as you try and pull her back to centreline which will only make the flare and cut a more hurried affair, increasing your workload and making an awkward landing all too likely. If on straight in approach you can see the runway all the way in you're coming in damn steep and will make judging the flare all the more difficult. There's a reason that real Spit pilots adopt the curved approach - I would suggest you adopt the same procedure as a matter of course. As shown here from 19:15: Part 2: Touchdown! Many of you will be getting down in one piece (mostly) but having a very alarming experience doing so. Wingtips slapping the tarmac, no particular bias, left or right, but either way you're off in the grass, generally facing the wrong way perhaps with a prop strike and maybe some clipped wings. Sound familiar? Me too. I was having exactly the same as you chaps, until I tried cutting later and flaring at a lower alt; I suspected the wing drop was coming from having too much sink on contact with terra firma and the energy from this, whilst not enough to cause a bounce, was still more than could be absorbed by the u/c. With no airspeed/lift to get back up it threw the load into momentum about the u/c contact points thus one of the wings is thrown down. All this behaviour will be exacerbated if you have any side-slip or side load on the a/c as you touch down. Bootfuls of rudder should not be required at this stage in low cross-wind conditions (check your crosswinds by the way; if you're in a mission where you're trying to land in heavy crosswinds then have a rethink. Trying to run before learning to walk is only going to frustrate you). If you're making large corrections in any plane to get on centreline then GO AROUND. Call it quits and try again. It's that simple. So what's the lesson? Cut later and flare lower. Keep rudder input to a minimum. By deliberately flaring at a lower altitude we reduce the height at which we drop from = less energy. By cutting power later the aircraft settles rather than stalls, thus again reducing sink rate = less energy. The flare itself I make very gently - hence the later power cut - as the low longitudinal stability of the spit and the stick sensitivity makes it easy for the nose to end up higher than desired. Get all this right and you should be rewarded with a gentle settle onto the ground and a satisfying squeal of rubber on asphalt. As you see in the video, my mains touched first followed by the tail wheel a fraction of a second later, so it does not have to be perfect three-point. It's just that the margins are narrow for getting it wrong. Currently your major issues will be flaring too high and cutting too early; just hold off a bit longer on both and it should make life easier. Part 3: The Straight and Narrow You've touched down with no wing drop! Hooray! However, the Spitfire is not yet done trying to find ways to embarrass you and inattentiveness at this stage will end up with you in the grass with some major airframe components likely scattered around you. FLY THE PLANE! You are not done till you're sitting back at the pan with the engine off! All those issues you had at takeoff with directional instability are just waiting to throw you off the runway. Stick back in your lap once you're sure she's down and staying so. Get on the rudder like Michael Flatley (Lord of the Dance/Riverdance for those who need a point of reference) - just avoid brakes! You'll have plenty of airspeed for the rudder to be effective during the early part of the ground roll. Just like takeoff, keep the inputs short and sharp! Adding brakes too soon will throw you into the grass. As you slow you'll start to feel that rudder alone isn't quite cutting the mustard; your inputs to keep her straight will become larger and longer; it's at this point you start bringing in a dab of brakes to help keep her in line. But keep dancing! Finally you'll come to a stop, engine still running, pointing the same way and with all major and minor structures still attached. And it's now that you are allowed to breathe! Congratulations! Flaps away and get out the god-damn way cos someone's likely to be making their final approach and could do without worrying about bumping into you! Getting this right takes practise - it took me a good number of attempts to hit the right formula and get it right more than I got it wrong. However, I'm able to do this consistently now - as long as I concentrate! - so I assure you it's not impossible.
  16. 5 points
    That is a major pain in the harris m8. The writing has been on the wall since Shoreham I suppose : (. Perhaps a solution would be to create a venue especially for air shows far enough away from population centres and main roads to be deemed safe. I vote for that instead of a high speed rail link @£82bn. If only.......... Maybe re route the M11 a bit ? Any slightly more practical ideas ? If they keep on legislating the risks out of life like this, in another 50 years 25 million people will suddenly drop dead of boredom on a wet Tuesday afternoon.
  17. 5 points
    I recall, maybe incorrectly, one of our members (Friar?) lamenting the fact that he was unable to find the rather exquisite score written for the Horsemen warbird formation display team by the late James Horner. Hitherto fleeting snatches of it were available on some you tube videos but invariably cut about and overdubbed with hairyplane noises and much talking - anything but the full, unadulterated piece. Well, I recently discovered this; please enjoy. I know I do very, very much:
  18. 4 points
  19. 4 points
    Read it here chaps, featuring some stunning photography of the graceful old bird: http://vintageaviationecho.com/arco-blenheim/
  20. 4 points
    Spent the day at a family's hobby of a miniature railway IMG_1467.MOV IMG_1480.MOV
  21. 4 points
    Just a few from me and my Samsung Galaxy S7... Me and Jabo enjoying the sun and ale on the Friday: Berlin Express before she became a cabriolet: The beautiful dh 88 Comet: Count the Hurricanes! Fruitbat getting down and dirty for 'that' shot: Jabo and Delta7: Fruitbat and taking a break from flying duties, our very own bongodriver:
  22. 4 points
    here are some pics, I only have a compact camera which of course decided to act up , but this should give a flavour; Reprobates that kindly took care of me 5 hurricanes (not four candles) First time Id seen hurricane fly One of the mustangs The one I would have taken home if I could Flying highlight Nothing compaires to the gracefullness of a spitfire in flight or the sound of the merlins and griphons
  23. 4 points
    Painless wins! Here's a little prize for you... Yes, for the first time ever I'm at the Shuttleworth Collection season opening air show. There's a Bristol Fighter in the overhead right now and I'm watching a Hawker Demon starting up. Lovely! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
  24. 4 points
    Have you tried telling the phone company there's a war on?
  25. 4 points
    Definitely blippage FT, i'll seek some other videos soon! In the meantime, my jaw dropped at 2:44 on this one:
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