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Showing most liked content since 03/22/2017 in all areas

  1. 6 points
  2. 5 points
    I know we have a video of this display already a few posts back but I found another with slightly steadier camera work and a bit less wind noise and thought you chaps might like to see it...
  3. 5 points
  4. 5 points
    Some from the show That's the lot - hope you like 'em
  5. 5 points
  6. 5 points
    Home after a very good weekend, great to meet up with some of the gang, have checked and the photos came out fine despite the camera acting up, will sort them out and post them soon. Highlights were 5 hurricanes together then hurricanes, early spitfires and blenhem flight
  7. 5 points
  8. 5 points
  9. 5 points
  10. 5 points
    Hey gang. Hope you're all well. Still thinking of you all. Especially Painless. Sweet, sweet tender Painless. Anyway, just thought I'd pop in and let you know I met up with Cold_Gambler a couple weeks back in Ottawa. Angus is doing well and says to say hi. Like me, he wants to get back to flying one day...but like me, talks mores than does. Creepily, he hasn't aged a day since I last saw him - years back when I stopped through Toronto to see BG in his forest mansion hideway. I suspect he is part of some cult that drinks the blood of virgins to stay young our something. He wasn't happy when I stabbed with with a sharpened crucifix. I might have been over reacting. Planning on being out there for Duxford. Bringing Jensen (of Jensnpark fame) out to celebrate his high school grad. He was just 4 when I first stumbled upon BG and Angus way way back. time flies I tell you. Will make sure I drop in more often.
  11. 5 points
  12. 5 points
    I really enjoy flying Operation Jericho, cheers Tom for putting it together. One of the best parts is the feeling of realism in the mission, it works really well for me. Browsing through the 'net today I found a short Pathe News film about the raid that shows what we are out to achieve and how accurate we are in what we do! Brilliant stuff.
  13. 4 points
    Whilst out for a cycle ride this afternoon on one of my regular routes, something caught my eye on the corner of a T-junction about 2 miles from my house. It looked like a granite memorial headed with the recognisable RAF crested motto, something I can't remember seeing before; I carried on but made a point of stopping off to take a look on my return an hour later. It turned out to be a (relatively new) memorial to a 603 Squadron Spitfire pilot lost on Battle of Britain day: F/O Arthur Peter Pease Here's the excerpt from the BBM website: F/O A P Pease Arthur Peter Pease, the son of Sir Richard and Lady Pease of Richmond, Yorkshire was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he read History. He was a member of the University Air Squadron and was commissioned in the RAFVR in September 1938. Called to full-time service in October 1939, Pease completed his flying training and was posted to No.1 School of Army Co-operation at Old Sarum in late May 1940. He met Richard Hillary there and they became friends. They went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on 23rd June and after converting to Spitfires they joined 603 Squadron at Dyce on 6th July. Pease shared in destroying a He111 on the 30th. He was hit by return fire but returned to Montrose, unhurt. On 3rd September he claimed a Me109 destroyed and on the 7th he made a belly-landing back at Hornchurch in Spitfire L1057, after being damaged in combat over London. On 15th September 1940 Pease was shot down and killed in combat. His Spitfire, X4324, crashed at Kingswood, near Chartway Street, Kent. He was 22 and is buried in the churchyard of St.Michael and All Saints at Middleton Tyas, Yorkshire. It's the closest Battle of Britain loss to where I live that I'm aware of and it kind of struck a chord with me today, especially as I hadn't previously been aware of it; I've lived in this area now for almost 12 years. So, I've decided to honour F/O Pease, virtually. For the foreseeable future, I will be flying in the Spitfire he was lost in, X4324 on Thursday's CloD nights. Further reading here, it seems a retired American academic paved the way for the above memorial: http://www.thenorthernecho.co.uk/features/13610056.An_American_academic_seeks_to_honour_a_Battle_of_Britain_hero_from_a_famous_family/
  14. 4 points
    Read it here chaps, featuring some stunning photography of the graceful old bird: http://vintageaviationecho.com/arco-blenheim/
  15. 4 points
    I can appreciate what you guys are going through with this topic. IL2 still does have the most content of any WWII sim out there. It is going to go away at some point. Just like Janes WWII fighters and the like did because of the lack of Windows support in one way or the other. I was not a fan of BOS when it first came out; indeed I fully regretted buying it. That has all changed because they have not only improved the flight models, but the graphics are much better, especially with the addition of the Kuban map. I very much enjoy flying BOX and a number of us fly almost every evening. With the future addition of the Battle of Bodenplatte which includes 8 Aircraft (P-51D, P-47D, Spitfire Mk.IX, Tempest Mk.V, Bf 109 G-14, Bf 109 K-4, Fw 190 A-8 and Me 262) and 2 Collector Planes (P-38L and Fw 190 D-9) that can be bought separately, I think, currently, that is where the future of WWII simming lies. Someday maybe DCS will get its act together and fix the horrible damage modes on the AI aircraft, (using simple fight models for them) until then it BOX for me. And but the way about DCS and complexity, you always have the option to use “auto start”. I never thought I could fly the A10C but I learned with the help of some in the community (that would be Capt. Jack) I found the experience to be very enjoyable. Any one of you that have or thinking about getting BOX, as Jack said, I, Perfesser, Spaulding, Gustang, wingflyer, are flying almost every evening, we’d love to see you there. I never thought I would be saying all this about a sim I fully rejected from the outset. All I know is that whatever you all decide; I will be all in with my financial support for the Dogz as always.
  16. 4 points
  17. 4 points
    The water and the ramp will need a bit more attention
  18. 4 points
  19. 4 points
    Spent the day at a family's hobby of a miniature railway IMG_1467.MOV IMG_1480.MOV
  20. 4 points
    A bit of paraffin burning light relief (look away FT )
  21. 4 points
    Just a few from me and my Samsung Galaxy S7... Me and Jabo enjoying the sun and ale on the Friday: Berlin Express before she became a cabriolet: The beautiful dh 88 Comet: Count the Hurricanes! Fruitbat getting down and dirty for 'that' shot: Jabo and Delta7: Fruitbat and taking a break from flying duties, our very own bongodriver:
  22. 4 points
    So it appears that I managed to catch BE's canopy failing - sorry the photo's a bit blurred but it's interesting all the same - you can see the damage to the leading edges of the tail and tailplane clearly.
  23. 4 points
    Thanks to Dave, Kev, Chris, Tom, Sid and Bongo for a great weekend. Minor hiccups aside, the show was probably one of the better ones of recent years with a welcome return of the Horsemen, five Hurrricanes (!), 12 Spitfires, 5 Mustangs and plenty more. And (especially for Michael) some piccies - starting with Friday. Mustangs in the sunshine; Richard Grace and the Fury; Not Steve Hinton as we originally thought but one of the other pilots renewing their display licence in Sharky. Pigeon rolling Dragon Rapide flown by the recipient of the 'Handsomest Pilot' award. More Pigeon Arrivals Mmmm Messers Shipley, Hinton and Freidkin (and some random old dude) The Horsemen departeth... More Pony action - this might go on a bit... That was Friday then....
  24. 4 points
    here are some pics, I only have a compact camera which of course decided to act up , but this should give a flavour; Reprobates that kindly took care of me 5 hurricanes (not four candles) First time Id seen hurricane fly One of the mustangs The one I would have taken home if I could Flying highlight Nothing compaires to the gracefullness of a spitfire in flight or the sound of the merlins and griphons
  25. 4 points
    Working on the old rail bridge currently. On facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BuildingAModelBridge/
  26. 4 points
    Painless wins! Here's a little prize for you... Yes, for the first time ever I'm at the Shuttleworth Collection season opening air show. There's a Bristol Fighter in the overhead right now and I'm watching a Hawker Demon starting up. Lovely! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
  27. 3 points
  28. 3 points
    BoX is a lot of fun! Watching FT dogfighting in the IL2 puts me into full-on Sid James mode too. How not to take off #1 How not to take off #2
  29. 3 points
    From the net. As a former SR-71 pilot, and a professional keynote speaker, the question I'm most often asked is "How fast would that SR-71 fly?" I can be assured of hearing that question several times at any event I attend. It's an interesting question, given the aircraft's proclivity for speed, but there really isn't one number to give, as the jet would always give you a little more speed if you wanted it to. It was common to see 35 miles a minute. Because we flew a programmed Mach number on most missions, and never wanted to harm the plane in any way, we never let it run out to any limits of temperature or speed. Thus, each SR-71 pilot had his own individual “high” speed that he saw at some point on some mission. I saw mine over Libya when Khadafy fired two missiles my way, and max power was in order. Let’s just say that the plane truly loved speed and effortlessly took us to Mach numbers we hadn’t previously seen. So it was with great surprise, when at the end of one of my presentations, someone asked, “what was the slowest you ever flew the Blackbird?” This was a first. After giving it some thought, I was reminded of a story that I had never shared before, and relayed the following. I was flying the SR-71 out of RAF Mildenhall, England , with my back-seater, Walt Watson; we were returning from a mission over Europe and the Iron Curtain when we received a radio transmission from home base. As we scooted across Denmark in three minutes, we learned that a small RAF base in the English countryside had requested an SR-71 fly-past. The air cadet commander there was a former Blackbird pilot, and thought it would be a motivating moment for the young lads to see the mighty SR-71 perform a low approach. No problem, we were happy to do it. After a quick aerial refueling over the North Sea , we proceeded to find the small airfield. Walter had a myriad of sophisticated navigation equipment in the back seat, and began to vector me toward the field. Descending to subsonic speeds, we found ourselves over a densely wooded area in a slight haze. Like most former WWII British airfields, the one we were looking for had a small tower and little surrounding infrastructure. Walter told me we were close and that I should be able to see the field, but I saw nothing. Nothing but trees as far as I could see in the haze. We got a little lower, and I pulled the throttles back from 325 knots we were at. With the gear up, anything under 275 was just uncomfortable. Walt said we were practically over the field—yet; there was nothing in my windscreen. I banked the jet and started a gentle circling maneuver in hopes of picking up anything that looked like a field. Meanwhile, below, the cadet commander had taken the cadets up on the catwalk of the tower in order to get a prime view of the fly-past. It was a quiet, still day with no wind and partial gray overcast. Walter continued to give me indications that the field should be below us but in the overcast and haze, I couldn't see it.. The longer we continued to peer out the window and circle, the slower we got. With our power back, the awaiting cadets heard nothing. I must have had good instructors in my flying career, as something told me I better cross-check the gauges. As I noticed the airspeed indicator slide below 160 knots, my heart stopped and my adrenalin-filled left hand pushed two throttles full forward. At this point we weren't really flying, but were falling in a slight bank. Just at the moment that both afterburners lit with a thunderous roar of flame (and what a joyous feeling that was) the aircraft fell into full view of the shocked observers on the tower. Shattering the still quiet of that morning, they now had 107 feet of fire-breathing titanium in their face as the plane leveled and accelerated, in full burner, on the tower side of the infield, closer than expected, maintaining what could only be described as some sort of ultimate knife-edge pass. Quickly reaching the field boundary, we proceeded back to Mildenhall without incident. We didn't say a word for those next 14 minutes. After landing, our commander greeted us, and we were both certain he was reaching for our wings. Instead, he heartily shook our hands and said the commander had told him it was the greatest SR-71 fly-past he had ever seen, especially how we had surprised them with such a precise maneuver that could only be described as breathtaking. He said that some of the cadet’s hats were blown off and the sight of the plan form of the plane in full afterburner dropping right in front of them was unbelievable. Walt and I both understood the concept of “breathtaking” very well that morning, and sheepishly replied that they were just excited to see our low approach. As we retired to the equipment room to change from space suits to flight suits, we just sat there-we hadn't spoken a word since “the pass.” Finally, Walter looked at me and said, “One hundred fifty-six knots. What did you see?” Trying to find my voice, I stammered, “One hundred fifty-two.” We sat in silence for a moment. Then Walt said, “Don’t ever do that to me again!” And I never did. A year later, Walter and I were having lunch in the Mildenhall Officer’s club, and overheard an officer talking to some cadets about an SR-71 fly-past that he had seen one day. Of course, by now the story included kids falling off the tower and screaming as the heat of the jet singed their eyebrows. Noticing our HABU patches, as we stood there with lunch trays in our hands, he asked us to verify to the cadets that such a thing had occurred. Walt just shook his head and said, “It was probably just a routine low approach; they're pretty impressive in that plane.” Impressive indeed. Little did I realize after relaying this experience to my audience that day that it would become one of the most popular and most requested stories. It’s ironic that people are interested in how slow the world’s fastest jet can fly. Regardless of your speed, however, it’s always a good idea to keep that cross-check up…and keep your Mach up, too.
  30. 3 points
    ... about the future. The future of flight simming in general and the Dogz place within the idiom and the community. Now let's be clear, I have not started this discussion with the aim of having reached some definitive agenda or decree about how the Dogz will move forward from hereon in. Think of this as a brainstorming effort. I'd like to hear everyone's thoughts, conjectures, opinions and even crystal ball consultations on the genre flight sim and what we think the Dogz will look like in the future. The first point of discussion will be the state of the sims we currently fly (if I miss any candidates please let me know). So in that vein let's look at our primary - Il-2 1946: Il-2 is a grand old lady, with a breadth of content unrivalled by any subsequent simulator offering. And it does not skimp on depth - it strikes a fantastic balance between simming enough realism to be satisfying without becoming inaccessible or tedious. In short, it's fun. With mod support we have unparalleled access to theatres and even eras. However there are issues technically and community wise that I suspect will come to make 1946 less and less viable as our primary sim in the future. It could be argued that perhaps some of these issues already are snapping at our collective heels. 1) 32-bit Program Support - we have to acknowledge the possibility that at some point in the future, windows support for 32-bit programs will disappear - this means no more Il-2:1946! There are of course ways around these things but this is an important aspect that must be recognised. 2) Player Base - the Il-2 community is dwindling. As people dedicate more time to more modern offerings or move squads wholesale to the next big thing the community around Il-2 contracts. Those still persevering end up in ever smaller and less relevant squads or go offline only. Newer entrants to the genre will generally want the newest, best looking and higher fidelity sims, and whilst some could be brought round to the delights of 1946, they will be a minority. We could perhaps pick up some these and also target the veteran disaffected types whose squads moved on to newer things against their opinion, both of which could boost our attendance in the near term but these cannot but delay the inevitable - that being that Il-2:1946 will eventually become a anachronism of the flight sim genre. If the Dogz stay with it then it is likely our fate will be similar. Pause cos babies making noise. To be continued...
  31. 3 points
    Good quote from the SoW forum from Stg 77 Count zero And usually in coops people would read briefings and do as told HaHaHA!
  32. 3 points
    I am growing old but I have no intention of growing up
  33. 3 points
    I've done as much as i could in terms of recruitment , but from all the guys i invited and joined our ranks only Dan is constantly flying with us , on both Il2 and CloD. And of course i call Thor every Tuesday :-). I will also invite some Finns and Germans for the Tuesday show - guess you know them from SEOWs - we'll see their response. But i also think that the ones from the kennel still here is mainly due to the fact we have solidified over the years a former virtual into a real one friendship - enjoying every minute together, laughing or empathizing , no more points competitors...I am sure we all wanted to prove (to ourselves firstly) something about flying in the past years, remember Flight Ladder , or TopGun competitions...well, that's all gone, at least for me ... Ah, one more thing...disturbing...some of us are getting older...and old gits like to stick to oll habits :-)...Yep, i had the guts to call it loudly and , why not, with pride ! Stay where the fun is ! ~S~
  34. 3 points
    Yeah, I know it's not about points, but I finally got over 20 kills in one session - without getting killed, without crash landing - well, one burst tire
  35. 3 points
    I have been largely away because of personal issues and in the past year I'm unable to get to my 'puter until minutes before everyone is packing it in because of work. I'm awaiting developments in CloD eagerly and I have pretty much decided to start picking up with BoX as I can afford it. I am a little leery of spending money on games because other people are playing them, as I have a whole stack of those that I've played for a minute then lost interest when every one else did, but I don't consider the Dogz "other people", so yeah, I'm for certain interested in keeping up with whatever transpires here, and I hope to be able to join up more in the future. In the end no matter that I enjoy space games and Shooters and any number of other computer related distractions, flight sims are my first love and the Dogz are my squad whatever else happens.
  36. 3 points
    Well after six months I must say BT and I are very happy together. I've had no problems and so far as I'm aware my connection has not dipped below the promised 50mb/s. In fact they seem to like me sooooo much that they're upgrading me to 76mb/s before the middle of November. Good show BT
  37. 3 points
    So, here's the completed section of the part that swings out, the car is in 1:87 scale, so it appears correctly, size wise that is, historically not so much, the car is way too modern. The light coloured horizontal beams that carry the deck are not glued in yet, so one can still vary the height of the deck. Still unsure whether I will create it with normal water level, or high water level. Here's some details on construction of the deck. Glueing all those planks on the frame. Each of them is 3mm wide. So, for 30cm I need 100 of them. No worries, I got 400. Yeah, I maybe miscalculated there. But, at a price of 1 Euro for 50, oh well. A lot of cutting to do though. Here's the jig I created for the railing. 6 cm of railing each time. An I need like well, not sure, but over 1 meters lenght I think, times two. At the bottom one finished piece. Test fitting the first bit. It fits, it works!
  38. 3 points
  39. 3 points
    As some of you may recall I set about modifying my MSFFB2 and Saitek X55 to see if I could combine them. Frankenstein time for sure! Today I finally got the missing pieces I needed, contact pads for the spring loaded contacts in the handle, that finally enabled me to complete connectivity. It works! Showing illuminated joystick. Red wine, the ultimate creative fuel! The other thing is the X55 stick paired with the MSFFB2 base, to the left (below the vino) you can see the Dsub 25 connector that pairs the handle back to its now divorced base. Said divorced base, currently not using the X or Y axis, but all buttons on the stick fully functional, FFB is pretty good, handle holds center no problem as the weight distribution is spot on. Next up is implementing trim using the X and Y axis on the X 55 base, and integrating the MSFFB2 buttons and hat (the interconnect cable has 15 spare connections so no issue doing this at all). Once the above is done I will then work on the collective mod I dreamt of, should make DCS rotary flying more intuitive with natural controls and FFB. Have 17 days vacation commencing next Friday, so hoping for more accelerated progress. [emoji4][emoji4][emoji41] Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  40. 3 points
    Top weekend with the Dogz, feeling slightly frazzled now but contented. Great to meet you Dave, thanks for showing me the way of Talisker Will report fully when I have the energy, but just thought i'd share this from the events of today to show how a heart stopping moment turned out good. P-51 Miss Velma - Engine failure and forced landing: Image Sequence http://forums.airshows.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=78045 Video stills
  41. 3 points
  42. 3 points
    It's now on display in the same shop as the other bridge!
  43. 3 points
    I just wanted to make sure that all of my British Dogz and all of their friends and loved ones are OK. I'm with you all, my brothers and sisters across the pond.
  44. 3 points
    This afternoon - from my kitchen door
  45. 3 points
    So I'm off on my travels again today. Anyone want to hazard a guess where? Here's a clue... Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
  46. 3 points
    So a few photos... Catalina Hawker Demon Fauvel somethingorother BBMF Spit LFXVI (I think) - Black primer! On a check flight from Coningsby - just stopped by! DH.60 Moth (The first aircraft bought by Richard Shuttleworth and record holder for the longest residency at a single airfield by any aircraft) and Miles Magister DH.85 Leopard Moth and Hawker Tomtit Miles pair - Messenger and Gemini Spit and Hurri trio DH.88 Comet "Grosvenor House" (Squeee!) - Easily the star of the show for me & something I've been wanting to see for years. So much so that I forgot to take any more photos...
  47. 3 points
    Hey! I'm Japanese too!
  48. 3 points
    Since I only use my PC for flight sims nothing about this update appeals to me. Internet security isn't a bother either as I don't do internet banking or anything like that and I'm too old and flaccid to be interested in any sort of dodgy websites - unless flight sim forums count as "dodgy" that is. I do have a vast collection of laptops - eight! - which technically belong to Devon County Council. As all the data on them lives in Babcock's* Cloud, if anything goes wrong with the latest model techie man comes over and gives me a new one. No joke. Saving the public's money? Why would anyone want to do that! *Babcock = yes, the defence contractor. They also run Devon's education services!
  49. 3 points
    After receiving a multitude of written complaints, the management team of the Lympne airfield have decided to move both the Windsock and the Radar mast so they will not be in the way of lousy pil2ots who appear to be incapable of stearing around them. Please do Donate, though moving the windsock is not expensive (though we had to wait for windspeeds to go down to below 1m/s - that took a big toll on the airfields supplies of sandwiches and tea), mainly, moving the Radar mast did cost a lot, as afterwards, it had to be calibrated again, it being further away from the North pole. (Or was it the windsock's pole?) Oh well...
  50. 3 points
    THE NEW HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER After retiring from the army, a former Artillery Sergeant took a job as a high school teacher. Just before the school year started, he injured his back. He was required to wear a light plaster cast around the upper part of his body. Fortunately, the cast fitted snugly under his shirt and wasn't noticeable when he wore his suit jacket. On the first day of class, he found himself assigned to the toughest students in the school. The smart-ass punks, having already heard the new teacher was a former soldier, were leery of him and he knew they would be testing his discipline in the classroom. Walking confidently into the rowdy classroom, the new teacher opened the window wide and sat down at his desk. A strong breeze through the window made his tie flap. He picked up a stapler and stapled the tie to his chest. Dead Silence. The rest of the year went smoothly.