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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/17/2017 in all areas

  1. 6 points
  2. 5 points
    Whilst out for a cycle ride this afternoon on one of my regular routes, something caught my eye on the corner of a T-junction about 2 miles from my house. It looked like a granite memorial headed with the recognisable RAF crested motto, something I can't remember seeing before; I carried on but made a point of stopping off to take a look on my return an hour later. It turned out to be a (relatively new) memorial to a 603 Squadron Spitfire pilot lost on Battle of Britain day: F/O Arthur Peter Pease Here's the excerpt from the BBM website: F/O A P Pease Arthur Peter Pease, the son of Sir Richard and Lady Pease of Richmond, Yorkshire was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he read History. He was a member of the University Air Squadron and was commissioned in the RAFVR in September 1938. Called to full-time service in October 1939, Pease completed his flying training and was posted to No.1 School of Army Co-operation at Old Sarum in late May 1940. He met Richard Hillary there and they became friends. They went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on 23rd June and after converting to Spitfires they joined 603 Squadron at Dyce on 6th July. Pease shared in destroying a He111 on the 30th. He was hit by return fire but returned to Montrose, unhurt. On 3rd September he claimed a Me109 destroyed and on the 7th he made a belly-landing back at Hornchurch in Spitfire L1057, after being damaged in combat over London. On 15th September 1940 Pease was shot down and killed in combat. His Spitfire, X4324, crashed at Kingswood, near Chartway Street, Kent. He was 22 and is buried in the churchyard of St.Michael and All Saints at Middleton Tyas, Yorkshire. It's the closest Battle of Britain loss to where I live that I'm aware of and it kind of struck a chord with me today, especially as I hadn't previously been aware of it; I've lived in this area now for almost 12 years. So, I've decided to honour F/O Pease, virtually. For the foreseeable future, I will be flying in the Spitfire he was lost in, X4324 on Thursday's CloD nights. Further reading here, it seems a retired American academic paved the way for the above memorial: http://www.thenorthernecho.co.uk/features/13610056.An_American_academic_seeks_to_honour_a_Battle_of_Britain_hero_from_a_famous_family/
  3. 5 points
    I'm trying to help out some folks when I see they could use some. This is an in cockpit view of how to use lead and lag pursuit. https://youtu.be/oN0BV_p-tJI
  4. 4 points
    Well chaps, thank you, had a blast. I had a great time. Crash, FT and Arthur hosted and it was fun! Thanks gents! It is the way to go...and jeez, these planes look good.
  5. 4 points
    Not a stick but I'm seriously looking at treating myself to something like this;
  6. 4 points
    To be fair I was on that side of the road a lot 😏
  7. 4 points
    Airfix 1/48 Hawker Fury Scratch built pit , rescribed panel lines and reworked radiator Paints were Vallejo acryllic aluminium and humbrol silver from a spray can Kit decals EZ line and E string fron guitar rigging
  8. 4 points
    It flies! P-47 'Nellie' (G-THUN) about to touchdown after a test sortie from her Duxford home (At least I think it's Duxford - don't remember all those trees though). This is going to freakin' AWESOME (as long as they open the taps a bit and not just have her stooging around with Sally B!) (Not my photo - it's in focus - Credit to Duxman over at the Historic Aviation forum)
  9. 4 points
    Thanks to Fenrir mentioning Artie having bumped/bounced on take off during our session last Thursday, finally found and fixed the rather annoying bug where one would be flying along nicely, and suddenly one's aircraft is being removed from midair ... POOF! That would always occur three minutes after one had landed. Makes sense, we do not want you to have tea and biscuits in cockpit. The mess! (Yes, that's the proper place to have those, apart from ground crew having to clean your pit). Artie bouncing meant the server probably thought he'd landed at take off. Somehow I've managed to add a test to the removal script, so it will only happen to AI aircraft... and within one minute now, not after three. Now you may think your a/c will stay on the field for like ever after you've landed, but no, unless you stay in the cockpit, once you press escape, your aircraft will be set to AI status, and then poofed after one minute. Disclaimer: only limited testing has been done, there's a good chance that during the mission running lots of blue ai aircraft occupy their home bases after having landed ... oh well, will deal with that once that happens...
  10. 4 points
    It's Spring! This morning my lawn is indeed lime green!! Lets see, Stonehenge is about seventy miles up the road from me, the Caucasus must be around three and a half thousand miles from me - and possibly in another continent - about the same distance as St. Johns, Newfoundland - so yes; it could be something in the water lol!! I had to drive past Stonehenge twice last week. It stands on a chalky meadow on the southern part of Salisbury Plain overlooking the A303, the main road to the west. Grass was...well, greeny as usual Thirty-two years ago I was at University in London. I did a spot of part time motorcycle courier work to keep the cash coming in too. In my second year I had a couple of lectures on a Thursday morning and then zilch until a tutorial on Monday afternoon. My mum lived in Devon - about one hundred and fifty miles away - and had recently been widowed. She was struggling with this; we all were and I was the nearest and most available of her sons. I discovered the courier firm I worked for had a job no one wanted to do - which made it a very lucrative job; pick up a wages tape from the offices of Barclays bank in west London before five o'clock on a Thursday afternoon and deliver it to a block house type building on an industrial estate just outside Exeter - in Devon - by midnight. By the most direct route this was one hundred and fifty-seven miles and you'd end up on the other side of the country late on a Thursday night with the prospect of a long and unpaid trip back to London. Thats why no one wanted to do it. However, for me it was perfect; a nice little earner and a long weekend at home with mum and seeing friends. I had a Suzuki GS850 with shaft drive, fixed panniers, a howling Yoshimura four into one and a nice big five gallon gas tank. The worst part of the business was the trip down to west London for the pick up and out onto the M3 motorway during afternoon rush hour traffic. After a couple of weeks I discovered the bank office was manned twenty four seven by their security staff. I could ignore the afternoon deadline for pick up and scoop it up around seven p.m. and avoid the evening traffic. As you leave the M3 motorway and join the A303 you pass a large green traffic sign that says 'The South West'. I love this sign. To me it says beaches, sunshine, rolling green hills, friends and family. It was also the point where I really opened the taps on my big GS and settled in for my own personal TT race across southern England. These days the A303 is largely a straight piece of anonymous dual carriageway but back then it was mostly a hundred and twenty miles of sinuous two-lane black top snaking westwards across the counties of Hampshire, Wiltshire, Somerset and Devon. Through the Spring I'd do the trip non-stop. As long as I dawdled down and out of London I had enough gas in the tank for the whole trip. If you wound the big GS up through the gears and then held it at around one hundred mph you'd get 'er down to around twenty - twenty five to the gallon!. After the summer break I took this job up again and as autumn set in I fitted a bikini fairing from a GS1000S which surprisingly helped with fuel consumption, the small screen helped to deflect wind blast too. I also fitted an (illegal) 85w halogen bulb into the big headlight for the onset of winter. I took to taking a thermos flask of coffee and some sandwiches with me and breaking the journey. A GS850 is not the lightest nor most nimble of motorcycles at around 550lbs but that sheer mass gives a certain planted feel to front and rear tyres. If you know the road you can get into the groove of things...if you know what I mean. No speed cameras and no radar back then either. Stonehenge marked the midway point on my journey. At night, and at speed you would come off that short section of dual carraigeway called the Amesbury bypass and follow that white line into a fast right-hand bend before the road briefly straightened out over the crest of a hill. Then at the moment you started to lean it into the following down hill left-hander you'd get a brief glimpse of the stones on the rising meadow a couple of hundred yards away. A minor road branching off to the right went up a gentle hill to make the northern field boundary. I ignored Stonehenge. I'd usually stop for coffee and a cigarette in a protected layby a couple of miles further up the road. One bollock-freezing, crystal clear night in late October I came hammering westwards past Amesbury at around a hundred and twenty. There on the left was a reflection of tail lights which rapidly grew into a blue and white Rover SDI of the Wiltshire Constabulary parked up at the side of the road. Oh shit. Sure enough, as I howled passed his lights came on and I knew he'd want to pull me. There is simply no point in trying to outrun the rozzers on a motorcycle. It can only end in pain of one sort or another. Much better to hide! As I crested the hill I knew they'd only just got their Rover going so I went straight on up the minor road to the stones on the right, switched my lights and engine off and coasted into the Stonehenge visitor centre car park. There was no other traffic around but I got to see the headlights of a fast moving car heading west along the A303 away from me. Phew. I broke out the coffee, sarnies and had two cigarettes. From then on I always stopped at the stones for a break. The visitor centre was surprisingly grotty and closed. If the car park was empty I'd climb over the chest high fence and have my little picnic in the dark, sitting amongst the stones and watching the occasional passing traffic below and listen to the slumbering sheep that also occupied the field. Christmas came and with it a three week break at home. The second Thursday evening in January saw me pull up as usual in the car park. I noticed the fence now had a length of barbed wire running along the top but since it was still chest high it hardly presented an obstacle. The sheep were gone. I'd just sat down amongst the stones when I saw a pair of headlights come on directly to the south by a stand of trees. Around a half a mile away. It was just after nine at night and I watched these lights trundle leisurely towards me along a track in the fields. They crossed the A303 and headed up the minor road and did a sweep of the car park. I thought about the new barbed wire on the fence, the absence of sheep and realised I was about to get nicked. Sure enough, the headlights belonged to a little white van marked 'Department of the Enviroment Security' from which emerged what turned out to be a nice man in uniform who escorted me off the premises. Luckily thats all he could do as he had no powers of arrest! He also explained that when I jumped the fence I'd set off an alarm and by walking over to the stones I'd triggered two pressure pads. Ah well, all good things must come to an end. Infact, not long afterwards the job itself came to an end when they started sending the contents of the tape down a telephone line. Apologies for this rambling nonsense having bugger all to do with DCS.
  11. 4 points
    Happy Birthday Royal Air Force! Some of you may remember that I said my Grandfather was a founder member of the Royal Air Force, this local newspaper article gives a good account of his involvement. My brother, who has done a lot of family research, put it together. Stephen Bullock...? Who's he?
  12. 4 points
    Read it here chaps, featuring some stunning photography of the graceful old bird: http://vintageaviationecho.com/arco-blenheim/
  13. 4 points
    I am growing old but I have no intention of growing up
  14. 4 points
    I can appreciate what you guys are going through with this topic. IL2 still does have the most content of any WWII sim out there. It is going to go away at some point. Just like Janes WWII fighters and the like did because of the lack of Windows support in one way or the other. I was not a fan of BOS when it first came out; indeed I fully regretted buying it. That has all changed because they have not only improved the flight models, but the graphics are much better, especially with the addition of the Kuban map. I very much enjoy flying BOX and a number of us fly almost every evening. With the future addition of the Battle of Bodenplatte which includes 8 Aircraft (P-51D, P-47D, Spitfire Mk.IX, Tempest Mk.V, Bf 109 G-14, Bf 109 K-4, Fw 190 A-8 and Me 262) and 2 Collector Planes (P-38L and Fw 190 D-9) that can be bought separately, I think, currently, that is where the future of WWII simming lies. Someday maybe DCS will get its act together and fix the horrible damage modes on the AI aircraft, (using simple fight models for them) until then it BOX for me. And but the way about DCS and complexity, you always have the option to use “auto start”. I never thought I could fly the A10C but I learned with the help of some in the community (that would be Capt. Jack) I found the experience to be very enjoyable. Any one of you that have or thinking about getting BOX, as Jack said, I, Perfesser, Spaulding, Gustang, wingflyer, are flying almost every evening, we’d love to see you there. I never thought I would be saying all this about a sim I fully rejected from the outset. All I know is that whatever you all decide; I will be all in with my financial support for the Dogz as always.
  15. 4 points
  16. 3 points
    Yes, it is a flying FW 190 A8 and it is stationed in Sweden. Unfortnuatly it isn't the BMW 801 engine, but a russian ASH82 one. Short story, from what I read in the comments: Many Flugwerke "parts" were required to re-build this aircraft. Which was crash landed on a farm in Southern Sweden by Ludwig Nitzsch of 1./J.G. 54., at the end of WWII. Ludwig returned to the farm on his release from the authorities and married the farmer's daughter. He lived in Sweden until his death 1998?
  17. 3 points
    Sim flying can get a bit silly. Still, awesome PC+ top of the range controllers+VR+motion platform is an awful lot cheaper than owning a plane and lets face it WHEN you mess up all you do is hit re-fly
  18. 3 points
    Well dont all feint but as I will have been on a work staff day in Warwick the day before I have just purchased a ticket for the Saturday. I will not be staying over just coming to the show to catch up with you guys. Hopefully be able to get on line soon (life a mess at the moment) Cheers Friar
  19. 3 points
  20. 3 points
    Everyone loves a Hunter, and a blue note
  21. 3 points
    Freshly refurbished and digitally restored for all to see here: https://film.iwmcollections.org.uk/ There are some gems in there, including this remarkable footage of Typhoon operations, including a crash landing and a crew-less Liberator performing an aerial ballet before smashing down to earth: http://film.iwmcollections.org.uk/record/638
  22. 3 points
    That's much better Tom, i found it a lot softer around centre point which was a lot better for me on takeoff, managed a nice smooth climb out. Also the final adjustments for touch down were a lot smoother, did'nt upset it too much
  23. 3 points
    Good quote from the SoW forum from Stg 77 Count zero And usually in coops people would read briefings and do as told HaHaHA!
  24. 3 points
    I've done as much as i could in terms of recruitment , but from all the guys i invited and joined our ranks only Dan is constantly flying with us , on both Il2 and CloD. And of course i call Thor every Tuesday :-). I will also invite some Finns and Germans for the Tuesday show - guess you know them from SEOWs - we'll see their response. But i also think that the ones from the kennel still here is mainly due to the fact we have solidified over the years a former virtual into a real one friendship - enjoying every minute together, laughing or empathizing , no more points competitors...I am sure we all wanted to prove (to ourselves firstly) something about flying in the past years, remember Flight Ladder , or TopGun competitions...well, that's all gone, at least for me ... Ah, one more thing...disturbing...some of us are getting older...and old gits like to stick to oll habits :-)...Yep, i had the guts to call it loudly and , why not, with pride ! Stay where the fun is ! ~S~
  25. 3 points
    So, yes, we do need new members. How are we going to get them? We should make a concentrated effort, and properly prepare it. What about: (just thinkin' out loud here) - A 'team' of recruiters that will set it up. Two or three members? - We need a new, fresh web page for that, where people can easily "sign up". (What we have now is too old/stale/long - as far as I can tell ... lol). - Properly describe our group, announcing what we fly, when and where. And our spirit(s). - Mentioning our 'events' (which are those?) If/when we start recruiting actively, we do need to make sure what we offer/announce is true to what we deliver. /can deliver We need to be ready. Meaning, if we get someone interested, and he/she clicks on a link, reads something, and tries and contact us - response should be swift and accurate. Sign up procedure should be easy - not too cumbersome. (I really dunno whát the current sign up is though...) Like said, just some ideas. Should we create a new thread, in maybe a less public place to discuss this all? That is - if my ideas on this are valid and being supported by us all
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