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Ssd Problems


Kira
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I screwed up.  Upon Boot exe, or somesuch failure, which caused a crash (complete meltdown, morelike), and unwillingness to restart, I removed the drive, as I've done a zillion times before... and promptly broke off the L shaped plastic that seats the gold connectors.  After some thinking (to include confirmation that the data on this drive, was, indeed, intact), I managed to get the thing back together (insert L into cable half way, carefully put gold pins in place, push L and pins the rest of the way in).  It was successful (obviously, I'm here aren't I?), but I'd like to get my current drive setup, complete, as is, OS and all, transferred over to another drive.  Upon attempt to do this, there are various OS files that absolutely REFUSE to be budged from there current location on the now questionable disk via the drag and drop method.  Any ideas on how to get administrative rights opened up so that ALL the files, regardless, can be moved from this drive to the more dependable one before I go monkeying with this one and causing possibly permanent physical damage to the drive?

 

I think I can repair it, super glue is a wonderful thing, but in case I mess that up, I want to have everything working elsewhere first.

 

Thanks all.

 

P.S. Local computer places will readily admit to having bins full of old SSDs, but of course, were completely unwilling to give me or even let me buy just a case (no insides, guys, just the damn case!) even after I explain the situation to them.  Thanks f*cks. I mean folks.

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You need to 'clone' the disk.

With either specific software that can do that from windows, or use Clonezilla. (link) where you boot a different OS (Linux like)

 

Some free software that can clone your disk: An example (AOMEI Partition Assistant)

 

There are others available as well, I would not know which one is best currently...

 

Be careful with this stuff, specifically when selecting source/target! 

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If you have a Western Digital or Seagate drive you can get a free copy of Acronis from their site.

 

This will clone the drive without issue (may have to do SSD > Seagate/WD > SSD though if no SSD by those makers).

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I've heard of acronis.  Unfortunately, the disk is a Kingston.  As per "being careful", I can attest to not being so, as I somehow managed to delete my entire D drive (all the "unessential" stuff, read: all my games post 10/15) after very carefully setting aside space on my 2TB for it.  SIgh. Oh well and anyhow.  Must have "deleted" instead of "moved".  Grumble.  I suppose square 1.5 is as good a place as any, certainly better than 1!

 

Thanks for the input gang.

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I really enjoy the security that Acronis (True image) affords me. As well as the clone disk feature, the ability to save accurate back-ups of all the data on my system, and restore them, has rescued my nuts from the fire many a time. Just recently I plugged a 2TB WD My book into my router and configured a back-up to be sent to it. It took a couple of hours 'cos USB is slower, but now it saves a weekly update of any changes that have been made on my drives. So if I want to restore to an earlier point, in case of a failed driver or hack or virus, I can - just like Windows System Restore.

 

Anyway, I set out to tell you why Acronis Clone Disk is so good. It just is! ;)

 

B

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